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Noticable difference: upgrade and clean install

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#1
tjmcs

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Hi, guys.

 

I upgraded to Windows 10 when it came out, as having my "copy" reserved. And I hate it. It is just too slow. I upgraded from Windows 7 and 7 makes this upgrade look like XP. It is useless. I am thinking of reverting back to 7 but I do want some more info. Is a clean install of Windows 10 markedly faster than Windows 7?

 

Here is my system specs: Asus notebook, Intel Core i5-2430m CPU at 2.4 GHz, 8.0 GB RAM, Intel HD Graphics.

 

Thanks.

j

 


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#2
Angoid

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I personally always prefer the clean install route rather than the upgrade route wherever possible.

 

Reason for this is that you end up with a vanilla Windows install, ready to set up the way you like and also to review what 3rd party programs you bring back on board.

That must be a 64-bit system you have there (32-bit systems can only utilise 4GB RAM) but are you running 32-bit Windows or 64-bit?

 

If 32-bit, then definitely download the ISO for 64-bit Windows 10 and clean install it (you cannot change architectures in an upgrade, this is technically not possible).

You should be able to download the ISO for 64-bit Windows 10 and clean install it, overwriting what you already have.

 

But be aware that if you do this, you definitely will not be able to revert to your earlier OS (Microsoft gives you 30 days to do this by preserving your original OS on your hard drive).  Also, be sure to back everything up before you begin as reformatting and reinstalling your OS *will* cause you to lose all your data.

 

Is your graphics integrated?  This means it will share system memory, meaning less is available to Windows. Less memory means less performance.  But with 8GB and a 64-bit OS, you should not have a problem.


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#3
tjmcs

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Thanks, Angoid.

 

It is a 64-bit system. And it has been over 30 days. I know if I go back to 7, I will loose everything. Can reload what I have in 10 if I go that route. Just fishing to see if it was worth keeping 10. Has some things I like. Just too slow as an upgrade.

 

joe


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#4
Angoid

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Hi Joe, it sounds to me (if I read you correctly - correct me if I'm wrong) as though you went from 32-bit Windows 7 to 64-bit Windows 10.  That will always be a clean install, you may not have the old Win 7 system any more.

If you have the original Windows 7 DVD or a restore partition then you may be able to get it back using that.

 

However, what *should* have happened is upgrade from 32-bit Windows 7 to 32-bit Windows 10, activate it (or ensure it is activated) and then download the 64-bit ISO for Windows 10, install it clean and then ensure it is activated.  It should have completely reformatted and reinstalled, leaving nothing from the old system behind.  Is this what happened?

 

You should not be experiencing problems with performance with that rig as I see it.

 

Is the entire system slow as molasses or just certain aspects (for example, booting up, loading software, etc) but once up and running is it perfectly OK?


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#5
tjmcs

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Sorry for being late, internet problems my area. The system was a 64-bit Windows 7. Upgraded to a 64-bit Windows 10. It upgraded and left my files intact. Had the option in restore to go back to Windows 7 but that option has expired. It has been over 30 days since the upgrade. The system has just been getting progressively slower. I have been told it is because of the Windows 7 files still intact. That is why I am asking if a clean install of 10 is noticeably different. Completely get rid of all Windows 7 files and start fresh. Can't hurt to do a clean install of 10 and if I don't like it do a clean install of 7, I guess. Just seeing if it was worth the trouble.


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#6
Angoid

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Well, a clean install should never make things slower unless the machine can't handle the extra workoad that normally comes with a new Windows install.

Files lying around should not impact performance at all, but if they are processes that are set to run in background and start with Windows, then this may impact it depending on what they are.

Do you think you could be infected with some kind of malware?


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#7
tjmcs

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I doubt it, Angoid. Too many scans have been run. I think it is just the upgrade. I have a laptop. Can't hurt to start fresh. Like I said, if I don't like it, I can always go back. Thanks for help.


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#8
tjmcs

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Dumb question. Since this is a laptop, if I do a clean install of Windows 10, will the install erase the preinstalled programs, such as webcam, troubleshooting, audio equalizer, etc?


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#9
Angoid

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If you do a complete install then quite likely, yes.

However, if it's an inbuilt webcam then it may detect it and automatically install the Win10 drivers for it.

But anything third party will have to be reinstalled from scratch.

Now is a good time to review what you really want to bring back on board.


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#10
tjmcs

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Yep, yep. Thank you for being patient. Let me do some research.


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#11
Angoid

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Don't forget that some USB peripherals may be installed as soon as you connect them.  It's very rare these days, especially with common peripherals (such as external disk drives) to have to install anything manually.  Try to remember what you did the first tijme round, or see if you still have the instructions / packaging lying around.


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