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RAM Memory


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#1
ionel424

ionel424

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Good day to all of you .I have a dilemma  and I would be happy if someone could help with it :).I have a motherboard(ASUS M2V MX SE) and currently have 2 GB of RAM(2x1GB 333 MHz each) and I would like to know If I can upgrade to 4GB(2x2GB 667 each) DDR2 that it is .On the ASUS Official site says that my motherboard supports DDR2 553/667/800 Mhz .Can I upgrade to 4GB ? and will it make a significant difference?.Thank you


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#2
Angoid

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I think the simple answer for you here is Yes:

 

Here's what I found regarding your motherboard:

https://www.asus.com...oards/M2VMX_SE/

 

Crucial Memory site giving memory upgrade options for you:

http://www.crucial.c.../ASUS/m2v-mx-se

 

This one's a UK site: I used it about a year ago when I did a memory upgrade (albeit not on a system like yours) but the service they provided was very good:

http://www.mrmemory....=ASUS M2V MX SE

 

As for what difference it will make, it could be anything from "not a lot" to "very noticeable" as it depends on a few factors:

 

1) Is your graphics card integrated or dedicated?  If it's integrated and using (say) 256MB, then out of 2GB only about 1.75 will be available to Windows.  Adding an extra 2GB will increase your memory to 3.75GB, and this will make a marked improvement if you've got a lot of programs running at the same time.

 

2) It will put 64-bit Windows onto the table for you.  That may be worth considering with 4GB RAM, but almost certainly not with 2GB or less.


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#3
ionel424

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I have a dedicated NVidia 1GB gt 610 and my question Is if my motherboard support that kind of frequency ,I will look into the link right away sir :) thank you 


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#4
ionel424

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I checked the ASUS official site and that's what I don't get .... The motherboard supports ram memory of 667/800/553 each or 2 of combined frequency that make 553/667/800 ?


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#5
Angoid

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Well, I'd only put in memory that the manufacturer states is supported, otherwise you could run into trouble with it.

 

You don't necessarily have to use a matched pair (of 2GB sticks) but if you do, it can only help.

 

That Crucial site has a "scan your system" button - using the computer you're wanting to upgrade, follow the link I posted earlier and click on it.  Follow the instructions and see what it comes up with.

 

Not sure if I'm understanding your post correctly, but those figures (667, 800, 553) are the memory speeds.  It's telling you that the mobo will support up to 800MHz.  667, 800 and 553 are the speeds of the memory modules they make for DDR2 (although there are others - avoid if the manufacturer does not explicitly state that they support them):

 

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/DDR2_SDRAM

 

Does that help?  As I said, I'm not sure if I'm reading you correctly, please advise...

 

Edit: It could be that the mobo will support two sticks having different speeds.  for example, one 800 stick and one 667.  If you do this, then it's possible that the mobo will slow the faster stick down to match that of the slower one.  Therefore, it's worth getting two sticks of the same speed or you may lose the extra performance afforded by the faster stick.


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