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Question about Anti-Virus Software


Best Answer RKinner , 26 February 2016 - 10:24 PM

I replace broken MSE installations all of the time with the free Avast.  I don't usually bother troubleshooting MSE but since you are worried I would first let Avast run a boot time scan:... Go to the full post »


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#1
NorthstarATL

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Hi! I ran into a problem this morning with a new Windows update (I am running Vista Home Premium), where the update failed. This has never happened before. My error code was 8007643, which it turns out is some sort of generic catch-all. The update pertained to Microsoft Security Essentials. Just for grins I updated MSE and it worked fine, so I rebooted and tried to install the update again. Same result. There was an optional update for Vista available, so I tried updating both, and the optional worked, but the MSE failed. I looked again for answers and did a recommended update of .net framework and msi. Rebooted again. Tried the update again. Same problem. I read a suggestion of uninstalling/re-installing MSE, and tried that. It took several reboots, as there were residual files in program files, and then I cleaned the registry. And now MSE won't install, giving me the same error code! Very frustrating. Having spent an entire day attempting to fix this, and not wanting to have an unprotected computer, I installed Avast, which installed successfully. My concern is that I still don't know what went wrong, and should I be worried, or just stick with my new anti-virus and be glad to done with the old? History tells me that a problem ignored is not a problem solved, however.

My computer specs:

Pentium ® Dual-Core CPU ES200 @ 2.50 GHz 2.50 GHz

Memory (RAM): 4.00 GB

System type: 32-bit Operating System

Any suggestions/help would be appreciated!

Thanks!

Kenn


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#2
RKinner

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✓  Best Answer

I replace broken MSE installations all of the time with the free Avast.  I don't usually bother troubleshooting MSE but since you are worried I would first let Avast run a boot time scan:

 

It takes a long time so I usually let it run at night while I sleep.
 
Open Avast, Scan, Scan for Viruses, Change the Quick Scan (in the box in the center of the page) to Boot-time Scan.  Then at the bottom of the page click on Scan Settings.
 
Make sure both boxes are checked and click on the gray box to the right of the orange ones.  It should turn orange.  Change where it says "Fix Automatically" to "Move to
Chest."  OK.  Now click on Start and then close Avast.  Mute your speakers so it doesn't wake you up when Windows boots.
 
When you reboot you will see the scan start.  It will tell you where it says its log.  Usually it's C:\ProgramData\AVAST Software\Avast\report\aswBoot.txt but it might change so verify the location.   This is a hidden location so you will need to tell Windows to let you see it:
 
 
Copy and paste the text from the log to a Reply when done.
 
That just makes sure there is nothing hiding that might have attacked MSE.  Then I would the MSE removal tool
 
 
I assume it would be version 2 that you have but it wouldn't hurt to run them both.  Remember to right click and Run As Admin.
 
Reboot if it doesn't do it for you.
 
Now download a new copy of MSE and save it.  Uninstall Avast, reboot and install MSE (right click and Run As Admin).  If MSE fails to install you may have a stuck install.  
Try running the System Update Readiness Tool

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#3
NorthstarATL

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Sorry to have taken so long to get back to this topic! I had the opportunity to purchase a new Dell Inspiron with a free windows 10 upgrade and took it! The old computer started "working' for a time while the new one was being set up, and I crossed my fingers that I might have two working computers at the same time, and that I could run tests on the old one and perhaps get it in better working order while still having a workable system. Last Saturday the keyboard/mouse froze and I lost the monitor when playing a video! I was able to bring the system back briefly, but the freezing up would occur shortly thereafter. I did the usual of switching out mice/keyboards, but with the same problem. I WAS able to get into safe mode with networking. Ran all sorts of scans (virus, scannoiw, file check, etc.), and made sure to transfer all files to external drives! Finally decided to try a re-install of Vista. The install never got past 2% expanding files before dying. I ran a diagnostic and got numerous errors that I looked up on the internet (can't recall the actual codes right now) which said that the hard drive was probably shot. I'm skittish about replacing the hard drive, as who knows what might also have been wrong, and then I have just a hard drive. I might try to get a refurbished second computer down the line. Knock on wood, the new one seems to be okay.


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#4
RKinner

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Hard drive replacement is pretty easy if you have the Vista install disk.  I recommend you stay away from Seagate drives.  They are getting a bad rep for reliability.


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#5
NorthstarATL

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Thanks. My fear is that it might actually be the motherboard, and that I'd be stuck with a hard drive that I'd have little use for. I couldn't find a definitive "this is what this error code means" after running the BIOS Diagnostic, so it's just a guess that the hard drive is the culprit. I have a Seagate external that is working very well. Saved me from a LOT of the damage losing the old computer might have done!


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#6
RKinner

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Is this a laptop or a desktop?

 

Is your external drive a 2.5 or a 3.5?

 

You might just be able to remove the drive from the external and put it in the sick PC.


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#7
NorthstarATL

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It's a desktop. I use the external on a regular basis, as I transfer files pretty constantly between it and the pc (a game that installs on "c" actually points to the external, as there is more room for the files involved on the external, for example), so I wouldn't want to mess with it. And, besides, I am not 100% certain that the only problem with the sick pc was/is the hard drive. But it's a decent suggestion. What I AM going to attempt is a putting in an older harddrive (I have two) that I retained from very old computers that went belly up, and that did so before I had the tiny amount of knowledge I now have, and see if one of them might work in there. The problem is that they are so old that they do not have SATA connectors, so I ordered a cheap adapter from EBay. I figured that way I am not spending more than five bucks to make more of an assessment, and if nothing comes of it, no harm no foul.


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#8
RKinner

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Some of the early desktops had both IDE and SATA connectors on the motherboard.  You might look and see.  Probably have to tell the BIOS to use them.

 

One way to test the motherboard would be to boot from a CD like Hiren's:

 

Hiren's boot CD.
 
 
Download, save and then right click on it and Extract All.  Click on BurnToCD.cmd and follow the instructions to burn the CD.  Then move the CD to the sick PC and boot off the CD. (You may need to change the boot order so the CD drive comes before the hard drive.  See: http://www.hirensbootcd.org/change-the-boot-order-in-bios/ 
 
I don't think it will run the miniXP without an OS but some of the DOS based stuff should run.  
 
Alternatively you could boot from a memtest CD
 
 
and run a memtest for as while to see if the motherboard holds up.
 
While you have the desktop open, clean the heatsink on top of the CPU.  (DO NOT REMOVE THE HEATSINK)  Many problems are caused by overheating due to clogged heatsinks.

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#9
NorthstarATL

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Thanks! When I had the pc open I did not see any alternative connectors to hook up the IDE harddrive, which might have just been that particular model. (I have the manual to follow along with), which is why I figured the EBay ones were the best way to go. I will run  your suggestions and see what happens! I had ruin across a mention of the memtest, but not where to access it, and thought it was an online thing! Shows you how much I know! Thank you.


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