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Windows won't start


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#1
robirdman

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In the morning, I turned my Nimbus  Win7 computer on, but didn't boot all the way, as I was going out.  It was at the windows password stage, and I couldn't find a way to shut down from there, so, I just powered off.  On my return I turned the computer on and it went to a screen that is not a blue screen, but only has an arrow and no way to do anything.  I have had it before, but always able to get out some way.  I rebooted and tried 'start windows normally' as before the default when this happens is something else.  It goes to load Windows, but I see no files being loaded and then it goes to another screen that says Windows, further along in the startup process, but then returns to the dead end screen.

 

Then I rebooted and tried ' start windows repair' instead.  Same thing with 'loading files' but none are seen and then back to the dead screen,

 

I disconnected all peripherals except mouse and keyboard and the same.  I tried again, with F8 and choosing safe mode, same.

 

I tried a disk that I think I made as a Windows repair disk (written Windows repair 7 64) and the same.  Checked in in a laptop and it has files or folders titled boot and such. 

 

I tried again, pressing F12 and got to a boot menu where I choose the CD drive, with this disk.  All methods go through the same partial process before going to the dead end screen where nothing but an arrow can be moved around.  This was a preinstalled system and I have no Win7 disk.

 

Then I wondered if I made a Win 10 boot disk from my laptop, where I recently switched from Win 8 might start something. but boot disk doesn't even come up in the Windows help search of System and Security in the Control Panel.

 

I also tried disconnecting the 2nd monitor and just get the same events happening on the other monitor.

 

Clueless.

Attached Thumbnails

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Edited by robirdman, 12 March 2016 - 09:57 PM.

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#2
phillpower2

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Hello robirdman,

 

Not familiar with your particular brand of computer, do you have a link so that we can check the specs.

 

Have a way of checking out the HDD but need the computer specs first before suggesting the best method.

 

This was a preinstalled system and I have no Win7 disk.

 

 

This is unfortunate as it means that you cannot download a Windows 7 ISO from Microsoft to use for a repair or reinstall, you need to contact the company that built the computer and purchase the proper recovery media or alternatively, if there is a Windows 7 product key sticker on the case and you are able to borrow the same version of Windows 7 on disk or USB you could use that for a repair or re installation.

 

Tip

To ensure that you receive notification of any reply to your thread please click on the Follow this topic tab, top right corner above your OP.


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#3
robirdman

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I keep paperwork on everything, so I was just searching my folders on computers and on music, but found nothing there.  I suppose it was only an email receipt and I have no access to that since my laptop got fried in September when a tech at Techshield fried the motherboard, while trying to fix a loose power plug port.

 

I bought this in 2012 from RAIN computers, on the advice of Presonus,, when I asked what would be compatible with their Firewire audio input.  It was a company headed by Kevin Jacoby, and was supposed to satisfy all multimedia needs, being custom built for that purpose, in particular musicians with studios.  It took weeks to receive because they said they were having trouble with the configuration.  I had problems from the beginning with Bluescreens that I had never had on any previous computer.  I would repeatedly  call for help then the last time I found they went out of business, after a pretty short life of selling overpriced problems. 

 

It was working fairly well with my Cubase audio system recordings recently, though that program had several 'Cubase has to close' messages recently including requiring task manager to shut it down after a freeze. 

 

I get an 'error 100c' after the screen sits a while.

 

I have found this link that I believe is the computer.  http://www.synthtopi...eo-workstation/

 

I forgot to mention that on my laptop, I got a notice that my Mcafee expired that day.


Edited by robirdman, 13 March 2016 - 02:38 PM.

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#4
phillpower2

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I get an 'error 100c' after the screen sits a while.

 

 

Suggests that the OS has become corrupt, this could be a result of Windows not being shut down correctly, a sheer coincidence that was going to happen in any event (a bad update or low storage space etc) or an area of the HDDs disk surface being damaged, let us know if there is data on the HDD that you would like to try and recover.  

 

That was the same computer that I found via Google, the info there is of no use to us I`m afraid, you got no recovery media so it is worth checking for a recovery partition on the HDD, a bit of repetition now unfortunately, to see if there is a recovery partition, restart the computer and try tapping the F2 key, if that does nothing, try restarting and tapping the F12 key, repeat the process if you have to with all of the F keys - F8 but including the Esc key, just trying to cover all bases here.


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#5
robirdman

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Some months ago I was having blue screens running my music program a lot more.  I saw that the C: partition of the base 1T  drive had little free space, so after backing things to the D: partition, I extended the D onto the D.  I then installed another 4T drive inside and that is now the D drive.  I think I did some system images to this or another drive but I'm not sure if I set it to do every week.  I may have. 

 

When I have tried the F8 I have got options for safe modes

F12 gave me the option to boot from the DVD drive and other USB drives.  Choosing the DVD and putting in a Windows Repair disk gave no different result. 

F3,4,5,6,7 gave me the test memory screen. 10, 11 gave me the noexecute screen. 

I took pictures of each screen but don't see an attachment link now. 

Nor did I get a notice for the last reply,though I checked the followup.  Doesn't it come in email? 

I made a video synopsis of the boot  /I extended the time or parts and cut out blanks, The first part is flashy as it was so short that slowing as much as possible, I still had to make multiple copies for it to stay on any length of time.  https://youtu.be/frOFMU9iMqw

 

Video compilation of all the screens I couldn't upload:

 

It did run the memory test and found nothing, while I watched it run, but could never see the results as it required logging on.

 

Thanks for helping.


Edited by robirdman, 13 March 2016 - 08:44 PM.

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#6
phillpower2

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We need to check the HDD by running Seatools for DOS but can you answer the following first please as testing a HDD includes a stress test which can cause a flaky drive to fail;

 

let us know if there is data on the HDD that you would like to try and recover.  

 

You are welcome btw  :)


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#7
robirdman

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I think that the main loss would be recent email, but that is probably not worth what it might take to recover, if it means removing the drive.


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#8
phillpower2

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No need to remove the HDD unless it is bad, two options for you to consider, let us know what you decide and I will then post the info needed for you to either 1: test the HDD or 2: see if you can access the data on the drive.


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#9
robirdman

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I would like to first see if I can access the data, so I could maybe copy a few things before proceeding further.

 

I am wondering how the 'follow this topic' is reflected as I get no notices that a reply has been given.

Thanks.


Edited by robirdman, 15 March 2016 - 09:24 AM.

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#10
phillpower2

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Try unfollowing the thread and then selecting the Follow this topic tab again, if still no joy, check your account settings, Notification tab, top right of page and then My Settings.

 

For data recovery, see Puppy Linux info below;

 

=================== 

***Required Hardware*** 

CD Burner (CDRW) Drive, 

Blank CD, 

Extra Storage Device (USB Flash Drive, External Hard Drive)

=================== 

 

1. Save these files to your Desktop/Burn Your Live CD:

  • Download Latest Puppy Linux ISO (i.e.: lupu-528.iso) 

     

    Download BurnCDCC ISO Burning Software 

     

    There are instructions on how to boot from flash drive with puppy here; http://www.pendrivel...e-from-windows/ 

     

    For computers that have UEFI as opposed to legacy BIOS, to be able to boot from your USB device you may need to disable secure boot and change UEFI to CSM Boot, not all computers and BIOS are the same, please refer to your user manual if you have one as the following steps are only one such example.

     

    Restart the computer, Windows 8 and 8.1 from the Start or desktop screen move your mouse pointer over the upper or lower right corner of the screen, when the Windows Charms appear click the Settings Charm, click on Power and then the Restart option.

     

    Windows 10, Click on Start,Power and then Restart.

     

    While the computer is re-starting,you will need to continually tap or hold down the particular key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer, we will use the F2 key as an example here;

     

    After restarting the computer, when the screen goes black, press and hold down the F2 key, wait for the BIOS to load.

     

    Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

    Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

    Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

    Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.

     

    If your computer will not boot into Windows at all, power up or restart the computer continually tap or hold down the key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer and then do the following;

     

    Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

    Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

    Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

    Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.

     

     

     


  • Open BurnCDCC with Windows Explorer 

     

     


  • Extract All files to a location you can remember 

     

     


  • Double Click 1%20BurnCDCC%20Icon.PNGBurnCDCC 

     

     


  • Click Browse 2%20BurnCDCC%20Browse%20Button.PNG and navigate to the Puppy Linux ISO file you just downloaded 

     

     


  • Open/Double Click that file 

     

    IMPORTANT: Adjust the speed bar to CD: 4x DVD: 1x 

     


  • Click Start 3%20BurnCDCC%20Start%20Button.PNG 

     

     


  • Your CD Burner Tray will open automatically 

     

     


  • Insert a blank CD and close the tray 

     

     


  • Click OK 

     

     


Puppy Linux Live CD will now be created

 

 

2. Set your boot priority in the BIOS to CD-ROM first, Hard Drive Second 

 

  •  

     

     


  • Start the computer/press the power button 

     

     


  • Immediately start tapping the appropriate key to enter the BIOS, aka "Setup" 

     

    (Usually shown during the "Dell" screen, or "Gateway" Screen) 

     


  • Once in the BIOS, under Advanced BIOS Options change boot priority to: 

     

    CD-ROM 1st, Hard Drive 2nd 

     


  • Open your ROM drive and insert the disk 

     

     


  • Press F10 to save and exit 

     

     


  • Agree with "Y" to continue 

     

     


  • Your computer will restart and boot from the Puppy Linux Live CD 

     

     

    4%20BIOSBootPriorityImage.png 

     


 

 

 

 

3.  Recover Your Data 

 

  • Once Puppy Linux has loaded, it is actually running in your computer's Memory (RAM).  You will see a fully functioning Graphical User Interface similar to what you normally call "your computer".  Internet access may or may not be available depending on your machine, so it is recommended you print these instructions before beginning.  Also, double clicking is not needed in Puppy.  To expand, or open folders/icons, just click once.  Puppy is very light on resources, so you will quickly notice it is much speedier than you are used to.  This is normal.  Ready?  Let's get started. 

     

     

    3a. Mount Drives 

     


  • Click the Mount Icon located at the top left of your desktop. 5%20Puppy%20Linux%20Mount%20Icon.PNG 

     

     


  • A Window will open.  By default, the "drive" tab will be forward/highlighted.  Click on Mount for your hard drive. 

     

     


  • Assuming you only have one hard drive and/or partition, there may be only one selection to mount. 

     

     


  • USB Flash Drives usually automatically mount upon boot, but click the "usbdrv" tab and make sure it is mounted. 

     

     


  • If using an external hard drive for the data recovery, do this under the "drive" tab.  Mount it now. 

     

     


 

 

3b. Transfer Files.

  •  

     

     


  • At the bottom left of your desktop a list of all hard drives/partitions, USB Drives, and Optical Drives are listed with a familiar looking hard drive icon. 

     

     


  • Open your old hard drive i.e. sda1 

     

     


  • Next, open your USB Flash Drive or External Drive. i.e. sdc or sdb1 

     

     


  • If you open the wrong drive, simply X out at the top right corner of the window that opens. (Just like in Windows) 

     

     


  • From your old hard drive, drag and drop whatever files/folders you wish to transfer to your USB Drive's Window. 

     

     


 

 

For The Novice:  The common path to your pictures, music, video, and documents folders for XP is: Documents and Settings >> All Users (or each individual name of each user, for Vista and above  C:\Users\$USERNAME\[...]. CHECK All Names!) >> Documents >> You will now see My Music, My Pictures, and My Videos

 

Remember to only click once!  No double clicking!  Once you drag and drop your first folder, you will notice a small menu will appear giving you the option to move or copy.  Choose COPY each time you drag and drop. 

 

YOU ARE DONE!!!  Simply click Menu >> Mouse Over Shutdown >> Reboot/Turn Off Computer.  Be sure to plug your USB Drive into another working windows machine to verify all data is there and transferred without corruption. Congratulations! 

 

 

 

PuppyLinux528screenshot.png 

 


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#11
robirdman

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Thanks, I have to study this.


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#12
phillpower2

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:thumbsup:


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#13
robirdman

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So I had a new C:drive installed and a very clean Windows, with only a recycle bin and a Google icons.

I had the old C: drive left in and is now the G:drive.

So what is the best way to check that drive now, without losing its data.

 

Still instability though, as after reinstalling my music recording software, Cubase and associated devices, I had some problems, and a blue screen already.


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#14
phillpower2

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One problem at a time please, testing your drive is not as important as solving the BSOD and we should address the stability issues first.

 

Who installed the fresh version of Windows 7 and what type of media was used as in genuine Microsoft DVD, downloaded ISO or a burned copy etc.

 

Was the computer running ok until you stared installing your music recording software.

 

1. Copy any dmp files from C:\Windows\Minidump onto the desktop.

2. Select all of them, right-click on one, and click on Send To> New Compressed (zipped) Folder.
3. Upload the zip folder using the Attach button, bottom left of the dialogue input box 

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#15
robirdman

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It was my nephew-in-law and he said it was a complete install of Win7 Ultimate, and updating all drivers.


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