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No longer connected to network/internet


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#1
Honkie

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When I went to bed last night the computer was working fine, but upon waking this morning I find that I am no longer connected to the internet or router. This is on a two computer network, and the computer I'm posting this from is having no problems at all as far as connectivity goes. Note, the problem computer is not showing on the router as being connected. This network has been working without problem for about a year now, and I haven't found any other problems with the computer besides this one.

I have tried uninstalling/reinstalling the network card, checking the connections (including swapping cables between the two computers),

ipconfig/all (typed, so not all the ....... is there)

Windows IP Configuration
Host Name...............:Computer
Primary DNS suffix....:
Mode Type................: Unknown
IP ROuting Enabled....: No
Wing Proxy Enabled...: No

Eathernet adapter Local Area Connection 4:

Connection Specific DNS Suffix:
Description: Realtek RTL8139/810X Family PCI Fast
Ethernet NIC
Physical Address:00-E5-4C-B5-5A-27
Dhcp Enabled : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled :Yes
Autoconfiguration IP Address : 169.254.212.111
Subnet Mask : 255.255.0.0
Default Gateway :

So...what happened? Did something inside the case decide to pass away, or...? I'm not bald yet, but my formerly full head of hair is gettin patchy from me pulling handfuls out all morning...
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#2
dsenette

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well your first mistake was going to sleep....that always ruins everything.

do the ip config/all on the pc you are on now. i would bet (i hope) that you have a default gateway set on this one. i notice that it isnt set on the post up there.
the default gateway should be your router
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#3
dsenette

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you also, at least from what you posted, don't seem to have an ip address
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#4
Honkie

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Thanks for your replies, Dsenette.

As far as the router is concerned, I'm not connected to it (no lights indictating such). It seems that my computer agrees with this lack of connection. There is no difference at all between having the cable connecting the two and removing it.

Windows IP Configuration
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel® PRO/1000 CT Network Connect
ion
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-11-11-61-08-A4
Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 24.116.39.12
24.116.0.202
24.116.33.232

That is the ipconfig/all from this computer...now how do I go about getting the other one to realize that it is connected, and get back onto the internet?
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#5
Greazy

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I would suggest a couple different things here. First, when switching the cables, did you plug it into a different port on the router? It could just be a port blew up there. Also, you aren't receiving the DHCP address when cable is connecting the two, the other machine is, so this again boils down to either cable, port on router/switch, or the NIC in your PC has either become partially unseated on the motherboard, or it has passed it's last packet.

Make sure cable is correct type of cable;
Plug into machine that isn't working, other end to a different port than what it has been using (use the port that you know is working if no others are available). If the lights on the router arent' lit, then something is wrong. Usually indicated by wrong type of cable or a bad cable, or as mentioned above the card is either bad or has become unseated, or the port on router has blown. Once you get lights, you should get an address, but until then, you are having a hardware issue and won't get an address until it is resolved.

Greazy Mcgeezy
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#6
Honkie

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Thanks for the reply, Greazy.

When I switched the cables around, I tried several ports, and did the same with this computer. This computer worked fine with all ports, and did fine with the cable that is normally connected to the other computer.

This does however confirm my fears about this...something inside must be out of whack. Time to open it up (*gulp*) and try not to break anything...lol.
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#7
Greazy

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It's not a big deal on most computers to check the NIC. (Older Compaq and Gateway machines are a major exception to all opening of the case rules.)

Just make sure that you stay grounded when working inside, STATIC IS THE NUMBER ONE CAUSE OF HARDWARE FAILURES. If you can see where the NIC is plugged in, just try to look before touching to see if a lot or very little of the contact edge of the card is showing. If it looks like it's risen out a little, just begin by pressing lightly. If you start putting more pressure on the motherboard than what you thing it should physically be able to resist, then that may not be the problem. Try putting the same card into a different PCI slot. If that doesn't work, try another card, (maybe the one out of the other computer or an older computer). Also, I don't believe it has been mentioned, but the device manager may show you if your network card is having issues. But some problems don't show like we would like them to. So it saying everything is ok, doesn't always mean that it is.

Greazy Mcgeezy
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