Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

New SSD - OS removal from HDD (Solved)


Best Answer sierrahotel , 25 December 2016 - 10:13 PM

I've downloaded the OS onto the SSD and formatted the HDD. I guess that's it for this topic. Go to the full post »


  • Please log in to reply

#1
sierrahotel

sierrahotel

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

I will be installing the OS onto my new SDD and would like to remove it from my HDD. I have backed up the HDD so I can wipe it clean if need be. Doing a search on google brought up a few things that didn't go into great detail. I'm also a bit out of my element here. Is there a straight forward way of doing this and if so, how should I proceed?

 

Thanks,

 

Matt

 

Specs:

 

Intel core i5 3550 3.30 GHz

P8z68v lx

Nvidia GeForce GTX 560 Ti (will be replacing)

Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600MHz

HDD 2TB

Windows 7 64-bit (CD)

SSD Radeon R3 Series (R3SL240G)

EVGA SuperNOVA 850 G2 220-G2-0850-XR 80+ GOLD 850W


Edited by sierrahotel, 03 December 2016 - 01:33 PM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
iammykyl

iammykyl

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 7,047 posts

Welcome back Matt.

Have a look through this guide and let us know if clarification is needed.

http://www.overclock...e-for-ssds-hdds

Check you have the following.

The Product Key.

The MB installation driver/utility disc.

If you intend to keep the HDD installed for storage, A new SATA cable, if one did not come with the new drive.

 

1.   Turn off the PSU, > press and hold down the case power button for 10 seconds, > open the case, > briefly touch a metal part of the case to discharge static.

2.   Disconnect the HDD at the MB SATA port, then the SATA power plug. 

3.   Install the SSD > connect a SATA cable from the same port that the original HDD used,(should be SATA 6Gb/s port, gray > connect a SATA power plug.

4.   Follow the guide. 


  • 0

#3
sierrahotel

sierrahotel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

Ok, I know I will need to pick up another SATA data cable. Yes I do intend to use the HDD for storage. As of right now my motherboard has two SATA data cables plugged into it. One to the HDD, and another to the DVD optical drive. So I will remove the SATA cable that was in the HDD and use it for the SSD. This is labeled SATA 6G_1. That's fine, I'll do that. As for the new SATA data cable for the HDD, does it matter where that one is plugged into? The DVD SATA cable is plugged into SATA 6G_2 and the four remaining slots are SATA 3G_1/2/3/4. Should the HDD be plugged into a 6G?

 

Thanks,

 

Matt


  • 0

#4
iammykyl

iammykyl

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 7,047 posts

I just reread the guide I linked and there are a couple o precausions to take..

First though,

As of right now my motherboard has two SATA data cables plugged into it. One to the HDD, and another to the DVD optical drive. So I will remove the SATA cable that was in the HDD and use it for the SSD. This is labeled SATA 6G_1. That's fine, I'll do that.

Yes correct.

 

As for the new SATA data cable for the HDD, does it matter where that one is plugged into? The DVD SATA cable is plugged into SATA 6G_2 and the four remaining slots are SATA 3G_1/2/3/4. Should the HDD be plugged into a 6G?

Not critical, but I think optimal, to have the old HDD plugged into the second SATA 6Gb/s port, gray, especially if the 3Gb/s ports have a Marvell controller.  Before you begin, I would swap the Optical drive to SATA 3G_1 then test to make sure it is detected and works.

************************

Re, the guide.

Recommend you use the GPT Format.

In this section, using Diskpart, "Booting and partitioning of GPT for Windows 7 Automatically"

Do not perform this command, > "6. Type Clean, press Enter".   This actually writes 1s and 0s to the drive, so it is no longer in the factory default, which is, the cells are empty, no Data at all.

Go from #5 to #7, Type Convert GPT, press Enter.

When you are up and running, look through the rest of the Tutorial  and decide how much further with optimizing you want to go.

 

Let us know when you have finished the OS install and we can then look at how you want to use the HDD for storage.

 

 

\


  • 0

#5
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 21,502 posts

If I may chime in (and complicate matters no doubt  :) ) from your previous thread sierrahotel;

 

Mind if I ask you another question? I will be installing the OS onto the SDD. I have backed up the HDD so I can wipe it clean if need be. I have been searching if it is possible to remove the OS from the HDD without wiping it of the remaining contents. Can this be done or is it best to just wipe it?

 

 

And an excerpt from my reply;
 
in answer to your question, yes, it can be done but how depends on certain other factors.

 

You should always have a back up of your C: drive in case of emergency such as HDD/SSD failure, the same for personal data partitions/HDDs + you mention wanting to keep some of the data on the existing HDD.
 
If me I would back up the OS that is on the HDD to the SSD, this will avoid you having to reinstall hrs and hrs of updates, depending on the amount of personal data that you want to keep on the HDD you may also be able to copy that across to the SSD as well, this a very roundabout way of backing up your most important data, AOMEI Backupper (free) is an ideal and easy tool to use for the above.

  • 0

#6
sierrahotel

sierrahotel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

Just waiting on the SATA data cable I ordered. Everything else inside the tower has been sorted including the new PSU.

 

Phil, you mentioned backing up the OS. My plan was to have the OS solely on the SSD. Are you saying that the OS can lie dormant on the HDD since the SATA 6G_1 will be hooked up to the SSD? Then in the event that the SSD fails, all you would need to do is a quick switch of the SATA cables?


  • 0

#7
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 21,502 posts

If you only want the OS on the SSD then personally I would suggest a clean install because it is exactly that, clean with no orphan files kicking around to cause you problems.

 

I suggested what I did to help you avoid the need for installing the many hrs of Windows 7 updates and to preserve the personal data that you mentioned wanting to keep ("I have been searching if it is possible to remove the OS from the HDD without wiping it of the remaining contents.") as I said in my reply #5 depending on the amount of personal data that you want to keep on the HDD you may also be able to copy that across to the SSD as well, doing a clean install on the SSD is fine but once done forget about the OS on the HDD, the drivers, firmware and security updates will not correspond with the new data on the SSD, ever heard of migration software, if not, many SSD brands ship their own software with their drives to help you back up the exiting C: drive for the sole purpose of what I have previously described.

 

NB: Should your SSD ever fail, as long as the HDD that has the present install of Windows on it is connected to a SATA port on the MB that is bootable the OS should still boot up, you may need to change the boot sequence in the BIOS though.


  • 0

#8
iammykyl

iammykyl

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 7,047 posts

Gday.

 

 

Everything else inside the tower has been sorted including the new PSU

Did that include swapping the optical drive cable to SATA 3Gb/s?

Do you have an external backup drive?

 

If you only want the OS on the SSD then personally I would suggest a clean install because it is exactly that, clean with no orphan files kicking around to cause you problems.

 

 

This would be the method I would use.   I just did this on a machine here, and it is a fair bit of work. 

Backed up Data to external drive, (included Network/LAN settings)

Clean install of W7, > drivers, > updates, > essential programs, 

Used Macrium Reflect to create rescue media.

Used Reflect for a OS drive image, (vanilla install image) saved to external drive.

Connected the old HDD > format.

Moved the User Folders form OS drive to HDD.

Reinstalled saved Data to user folders on the HDD.

Created a second image. NB.   Image is of C and E.

Set up a Backup schedule.

Took over 4 hours, not including Windows update.

My wife is now personalizing the system, if anything goes wrong, reinstalling an image only takes 15 min. 


  • 0

#9
sierrahotel

sierrahotel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

Gday.

 

 

Everything else inside the tower has been sorted including the new PSU

Did that include swapping the optical drive cable to SATA 3Gb/s?

Do you have an external backup drive?

 

If you only want the OS on the SSD then personally I would suggest a clean install because it is exactly that, clean with no orphan files kicking around to cause you problems.

 

 

This would be the method I would use.   I just did this on a machine here, and it is a fair bit of work. 

Backed up Data to external drive, (included Network/LAN settings)

Clean install of W7, > drivers, > updates, > essential programs, 

Used Macrium Reflect to create rescue media.

Used Reflect for a OS drive image, (vanilla install image) saved to external drive.

Connected the old HDD > format.

Moved the User Folders form OS drive to HDD.

Reinstalled saved Data to user folders on the HDD.

Created a second image. NB.   Image is of C and E.

Set up a Backup schedule.

Took over 4 hours, not including Windows update.

My wife is now personalizing the system, if anything goes wrong, reinstalling an image only takes 15 min. 

 

Yes I did move the optical drive to SATA 3G_1. I do have an external hard drive and have already backed up the HDD contents to it.

 

I think you both are correct and a clean install would be the best way to go. I'll have to leave this for the weekend though.

 

iammykyl, you listed a number of steps which I am not familiar with like Macrium reflect, a vanilla image and I'm not certain why the user folders are going to the HDD. Actually I'm not sure what a second image is, or a backup schedule. Oh boy, looks like this is going to be fun.


  • 0

#10
iammykyl

iammykyl

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 7,047 posts

Sorry if I made it sound more complicated than it is.  You don't have to do the whole process at one go. 

Read/download Macrium Reflect free, does rescue media, Disk imaging, backups and more, > http://www.macrium.c...eflectfree.aspx

 

A vanilla image is the first image you take of the clean install of the OS that includes, Windows Updates all other updates like Chipset Drivers/GPU etc.

Firewall and virus protection, Browser and Macrium Reflect,  but not programs like Office/Photoshop.    This is your basic working system that you can reinstall to your System disk, in case of a complete disaster and you can start again. 

 

Moving User Folders to a storage drive is slightly different in each version of windows, for W10 > http://www.dummies.c...-in-windows-10/  

 

The second image.   When you move the User Folders or install programs from say "C:\Documents and Settings\Owner\My Documents\DOWNLOADS" to another Disk, the path becomes "D:\Documents and Settings\Owner\My Documents\DOWNLOADS" so the two drives are linked.  That image restores a complete working system.

 

There is a but.

 

Any new Data written to the system would not be included on the image you have taken, hence the need for regular scheduled backups, so after reinstalling an image you can update it with your saved Data backups. 

 

You could do this.

Remember to disconnect the old HDD.

Get your OS working on the new drive.

Use Reflect to create rescue media, and save an image.

Post back for exact instructions for relocation W7 user folders.

 

If you need to keep using the computer, disconnect the SSD, reconnect the HDD and carry on. 


  • 0

Advertisements


#11
sierrahotel

sierrahotel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

So an image is like taking a photo; a snapshot in time.

 

As for the OS, I have Win7 on the HDD right now. My laptop came with Win8 which was subsequently freely updated to Win10. Just to get your opinions on this, what do you think about installing Win10 instead of Win7? I know some people have mentioned doing it through the use of a USB. I figure after installing Win7 I would be prompted to install Win10, that has happened in the past and I have ignored it. This was because FSX did not run well on Win10 for a time. Does upgrading from Win7 to Win10 leave a bunch of misc files and registries and what not? I know a lot of people still prefer Win7 to Win10. What do you think?

 

At present I'm probably good to go with the new OS install on the SSD. I installed a new USB 3.0 (5) PCI-E card and the new SATA data cable. Still waiting on a USB 3.0 attachment to the front of the tower which will connect via a 19/20pin.


  • 0

#12
iammykyl

iammykyl

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 7,047 posts

So an image is like taking a photo; a snapshot in time.

Yes.   It can be done from within Windows, but it only allows you to keep one current snapshot, (with the same name) so you have to go through hoops to keep more than the current one.   Reflect will allow you to keep multiple snapshots. 

 

I  have Win7 on the HDD right now. 

As you have the CD and key, you can fresh install to the SSD.   

Windows 10 does not run very well on the Z86 MBs as there are no W10 Chipset drivers, so I would not try to upgrade, + the free upgrade is now only available to users who need assistive technologies.

 

I know a lot of people still prefer Win7 to Win10. What do you think?

I prefer W7 to 10, but in a few years it will go the way of XP, which I still think is the best of all the Versions. 


  • 0

#13
sierrahotel

sierrahotel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

 

 

************************

Re, the guide.

Recommend you use the GPT Format.

In this section, using Diskpart, "Booting and partitioning of GPT for Windows 7 Automatically"

Do not perform this command, > "6. Type Clean, press Enter".   This actually writes 1s and 0s to the drive, so it is no longer in the factory default, which is, the cells are empty, no Data at all.

Go from #5 to #7, Type Convert GPT, press Enter.

When you are up and running, look through the rest of the Tutorial  and decide how much further with optimizing you want to go.

 

Let us know when you have finished the OS install and we can then look at how you want to use the HDD for storage.

 

 

\

 

So I was about to install the OS on the SSD and had a couple of thoughts first. You recommend GPT as opposed to MBR. My motherboard is a UEFI so I gather that is why you suggested it. I had a gander at the benefits from Sean's website.

 

Benefits of a UEFI/GPT boot disk vs. MBR:

  • Although not currently applicable to SSDs, GPT disks can exceed the 2.2TB bootable limit of a MBR partitioned drive. MBR drives are limited to four partition table entries, unless a secondary "extended" partition structure is created.
  • Data critical to platform operation is located in partitions, and not in un-partitioned or "hidden" sectors which in certain instances, can lead to system instability. Data contained in hidden sectors that result in system problems are difficult to debug.
  • GPT disks use primary and backup partition tables for redundancy and 32-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC32) fields for improved partition data structure integrity.
  • A UEFI boot is more secure, and less vulnerable to pre-boot malware.
  • A system utilizing a UEFI boot, will boot and recover from sleep faster than the same machine using MBR.
  • UEFI is the future, and as different implementations of UEFI mature, UEFI will be used for much more than just booting a computer.

 

So I'll proceed with GPT I guess. This is an area that I am not well versed in. I did check out the following video which I thought was well done. This may be the MBR version though I think.

 

Actually came across this video and it explains MBR vs GPT. So my BIOS should be MBR by default and I have to make it UEFI? I have to disable a CSM or enable an SB or something. This is the confusing part here. Continuing to research it.

 

This video appears to be a little different from Sean's. steps 3 to 7 are omitted.

 

 

I will still avoid step #6 as you suggested.


Edited by sierrahotel, 18 December 2016 - 04:20 PM.

  • 0

#14
iammykyl

iammykyl

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 7,047 posts

 

 

 So my BIOS should be MBR by default and I have to make it UEFI? I have to disable a CSM or enable an SB or something

Yes.   I have looked through your MB Manual and can find no mention of CSM, it may not have been part of earlier BIOS.   Can you search through yours to see if it present. Does your bios look like this?  > https://communities....82/DSCF5295.JPG


  • 0

#15
sierrahotel

sierrahotel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

My manual is the first edition (V1) July 2011 E6771. It does however have a couple of loose additional pages thrown in. One of them states that my motherboard has Intel's Smart Response Technology and that to use this would mean placing BIOS into RAID mode.

 

The BIOS looks very similar to the image. It is basically the same except the Boot Option Priorities only shows two boot options #1 and #2. There is also a Boot Override section that follows below with two SATA lines followed by Hard Drive BBS Priorities and CD/DVD ROM Drive BBS Priorities which are apparent in the image you posted.

 

As for CSM, I do not see any reference to it.


  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP