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range for wireless communications


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#1
Craig Godfrey

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distance and strength
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#2
Craig Godfrey

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I would like to know the max distance for it
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#3
Craig Godfrey

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anyone?
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#4
paws

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Hi Craig Godfrey and welcome to our forums

:welcome:

Its difficult to give you an accurate answer without knowing a great deal more information.... especially the type of wifi you are interested in, the devices you are using or intend to use etc., however for example if you are interested in the range provided  by the standard wireless access point incorporated in many modems/routers/access points then the standard spec usually gives a maximum range of around 30 metres or so in clear air

 

Attenuation of the signal will reduce the range available and factors that need to be taken into account include the presence or otherwise of metallic objects, thick walls or other "signal reduction" artifacts.

 

Very much longer ranges are available with specialist equipment (several kilometers) but up to a maximum of 30 metres would be a reasonable figure to work with assuming the normal sort of wifi access point incorporated  in a lot of routers and using a typical modern laptop computer.

 

Post back with any specific questions you have or any amplification required and one of us will do our best to help

Regards

paws


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#5
JordanMihailov

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http://robotsforrobo...tions-antennas/


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#6
Craig Godfrey

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no just lookin for how far we can send revive singnals can't find out anywere
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#7
Craig Godfrey

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Hi Craig Godfrey and welcome to our forums
:welcome:
Its difficult to give you an accurate answer without knowing a great deal more information.... especially the type of wifi you are interested in, the devices you are using or intend to use etc., however for example if you are interested in the range provided  by the standard wireless access point incorporated in many modems/routers/access points then the standard spec usually gives a maximum range of around 30 metres or so in clear air
 
Attenuation of the signal will reduce the range available and factors that need to be taken into account include the presence or otherwise of metallic objects, thick walls or other "signal reduction" artifacts.
 
Very much longer ranges are available with specialist equipment (several kilometers) but up to a maximum of 30 metres would be a reasonable figure to work with assuming the normal sort of wifi access point incorporated  in a lot of routers and using a typical modern laptop computer.
 
Post back with any specific questions you have or any amplification required and one of us will do our best to help
Regards
paws


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#8
Craig Godfrey

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I'm new lol never meant to re post that
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#9
terry1966

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no just lookin for how far we can send revive singnals can't find out anywere

theoretically there is no limit to the range you can communicate wireless.

 

eg. :- "The voyager one spacecraft is 11,000,000,000 miles away from the earth and currently the farthest man-made object in space and it still communicates with us"

https://www.quora.co...can-communicate

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 28 December 2016 - 05:14 PM.

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#10
azarl

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It depends on a number of factors

For standard home WIFi: Indoors, a few yards. Walls and things tend to attenuate the signal. Without walls in the way, maybe 25 - 50 yards. With an amplifier antenna on your pc, 2 - 3 times that, possibly more.  You can get outdoor repeaters and WIFi bridges to seriously increase that range.


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#11
HolyCowZ

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You can get boosters that will boost your wifi signal and send it a greater distance and use an wifi aerial to get a better signal the other end.

How far will depend on if it has to go through walls and other conflicting signals in the area and maybe even the weather if any of the aerials are outside.

There are a number of tutorials on the web on how to boost the effectiveness of a wifi antenna attached to the receiving device by making it directional.

What ever you get make sure it has some kind of encryption built in (wpa2) unless you want everyone using it and others maybe steal your data.

If it is to work in the same building they do plug in Ethernet points now that turns your electrical system into Ethernet ports without effecting the flow of electric great if you have problems getting a signal.


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