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HDD damaged, OS won't boot, want to copy files


Best Answer phillpower2 , 15 February 2017 - 07:41 AM

You are welcome PBot   Keep Puppy in your PC toolbox, experiment with it when you have some free time, you never know when you may be able to use it to help a family member or friend who... Go to the full post »


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#46
Phlegmbot

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Hey, Phill. I sort of expected this based on the fact no other Dell programs would work, but the Dell B&R wouldn't work. My guess is that it's looking for a C: drive and not finding it. There are recent restore points that were created by Windows during the downloads of the updates (all updates are DL'd).

 

As before, however, i've nothing on the HDD save for the OS and Firefox, so it's not like there's any data to lose. I've not had a chance to DL any programs here, and i can't put my files on here b/c the external HDD cannot be read with the drive set to G:


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#47
phillpower2

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Most likely correct but was hoping you would be able to create a back up before shrinking the partition, as Windows is on the primary G: partition you can`t even allocate it the drive letter C: to see if it helped  :(

 

See Option one here How to Shrink a Partition or Volume in Windows 7 please read the instructions thoroughly before proceeding and especially the Dynamic disk info.

 

See if you can shrink the partition for Windows only to about 150GB and the other partition for data, this will give you plenty of room for future updates etc.


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#48
Phlegmbot

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See if you can shrink the partition for Windows only to about 150GB and the other partition for data, this will give you plenty of room for future updates etc.

 

But there is only ONE partition (see image sent previously). There are 2 volumes, but i don't know if that's what you mean.  So if I shrink that primary partition, I have nothing else.

 

G drive is the bulk of the drive at 465GB with "system reserved" at 100mb. But they're not listed as 2 partitions.

 

What about that program I linked to? Is it valid or do you perhaps know of another tool that works as that one says it does?


Edited by Phlegmbot, 30 January 2017 - 05:34 AM.

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#49
phillpower2

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You shrink G: so that you end up with unallocated space on the right, this can then be formatted and given a drive letter, it can all be done using Windows own tools and is explained at the Windows 7 link.


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#50
Phlegmbot

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Hi, Phill,

 

OK. I'm just a little nervous about doing this. Not trying to be contrary, just unsure...I'm essentially separating out sections of the drive into different letters without any real understanding of what I'm doing, the possible effects, and how to ensure existing drivers remain in the right place. I mean, you might understand it, but I don't...so it makes me hesitant.

 

I did however open up Disk Management again, and when I right-clicked and chose Shrink Volume, it analyzed and read: "Amount of Available Shrink Space: [approx.] 13.5 gigs" -- which sounds like it's much smaller than it should be. Like, if all I have is the OS and a few programs (IE,  Firefox...) shouldn't I be able to shrink the volume by a few hundred gigs?

 

I also realized the MS guy left a program called MiniTool partition on my PC. It seems to have a lot of tools, but I can't really say I understand most of them. I dunno. Frustrated with all of this at this point (not b/c of you -- at all). I might have to call MS, have them clean up their f--king mess...but I've a ton of work today. Urg.

 

PBot


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#51
Phlegmbot

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Going back to my failed HDD for a moment: I spoke to a data recovery place who asked me if I had an enclosure for this 2,5" SATA. I told them I did. He said put it in and then plug in the USB. I told him I heard a beeping noise. He said to unplug it immediately, and that that means there's -- i forgot what he called it -- something sticking to the platter. That's usually what the beeping means. I mentioned that the PC gets no reading from the drive -- it knows I've attached a USB device but it doesn't seem to know there's a drive there -- and he said it's unlikely that any conventional means would read the drive.

 

He seemed like a nice guy, but a bit panicky (he spent more than 30 minutes on the phone w/me explaining the various ways in which HDDs can go wrong and how they approach them -- he seemed sincere, not salesmany, but I do think he was overselling it a bit).

 

Anyway, wanted to know your thoughts on all of this.

 

Thanks again, Phill.


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#52
phillpower2

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Hello PBot,

 

Need to be brief as got to head back to work shortly.

 

The idea of trying to shrink the G: partition was to free up empty space to the right of the G: partition so you could save any future personal data on a newly created partition, the contents on the present G: partition would have remained in place on the G: partition.

 

I have absolutely no idea why anything has been left on your new HDD, other than Windows, Dell drivers and FF install software there should be nothing on it, we need to find out what exactly is on it.

 

Download then run Speccy (free) and post the resultant url for us, details here,  

 

Was it the actuator arm the data recovery tech referred to.

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#53
Phlegmbot

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Hi, Phill,

 

Here's the Speccy URL: http://speccy.pirifo...roZJ8rgHAhY5Sn8

 

So, in terms of the drive partition, MS called me and said the same thing -- basically stating that,yeah, it's something we can do, but for reasons I didn't quite understand, he felt it'd be better to just reinstall Windows. SO! For a FOURTH time in a week, Windows has been reinstalled. yay.  That said, Windows is working fine now. I'd still like to be sure that the drive I have was indeed blank when I got it (it came in a sealed package, but that doesn't mean anything)...but with all the formatting and OS system adding and partitioning that's gone on, I dunno if there's any way you'll be able to tell that.

 

I have also now noticed that my PC is reporting only 2GB RAM, it should be 4, so that means one of the RAM cards is loose -- probably from when I bumped the PC recently and messed up the drive. I will attempt to fix that tonight (Dell's RAM card holders in this model are crap and very frustrating.)

 

RE: the HDD: No, he said b/c I wasn't hearing clicking that it's probably not the actuator arm. He said something was possible sticking to the platter. A read/write head maybe? It's been suggested that if I get more power to the drive that that might be able to fix it, help it spin. But also, that could damage it more. I remember you saying something about the PCB -- what are your thoughts on all this?

 

Thanks again, Phill!!

 

-PBot


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#54
phillpower2

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Hello PBot,

 

That looks a whole lot better  :thumbsup:

 

I notice that you have SAS installed, thats a good idea but even better to have an AV as well,

 

Now that everything is stable I would create a back up image of the new C: drive using Macrium Reflect (free) Essexboy tutorial here

 

Would still try the flaky HDD with Puppy Linux tbh.

 

NB: Did you install the Yandex browser we can see in Speccy.


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#55
RolandJS

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A power supply not giving enough constant power to everything inside and attached to the computer can indeed under-power a HD, and that HD can develop problems.  To my knowledge, a power supply cannot over-power a computer. 


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#56
Phlegmbot

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Hello PBot,

 

That looks a whole lot better  :thumbsup:

 

I notice that you have SAS installed, thats a good idea but even better to have an AV as well,

 

Now that everything is stable I would create a back up image of the new C: drive using Macrium Reflect (free) Essexboy tutorial here

 

Would still try the flaky HDD with Puppy Linux tbh.

 

NB: Did you install the Yandex browser we can see in Speccy.

 

Re: AV: Yup, I just hadn't gotten to it at that point. I use Avast,  but please let me know if you recommend something else.

 

RE: the bad HDD: What is "Puppy Linux"? Will that somehow help my PC recognize the HDD? Don't forget, the PC can't even recognize that it's attached.

 

Yandex came with DriverPack, so I thought I'd approve the DL and give it a try.

 

 

A power supply not giving enough constant power to everything inside and attached to the computer can indeed under-power a HD, and that HD can develop problems.  To my knowledge, a power supply cannot over-power a computer. 

 

Hi, Roland, I'm uncertain what you mean about "over-power." The question was more of: if I give MORE power to the HD than my USB enclosure can give it (it's been suggested that I try an enclosure that plugs into a wall or even putting it into a desktop PC), will I have a better chance of reading it.

 

 

Thanks, both!

 

-PBot


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#57
RolandJS

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Ahhh, I was thinking in general, I forgot you had a specific in mind; I think if the HD in question is powered by an outside source, it might be readable or it might not.  Please let us know how everything works out.


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#58
Phlegmbot

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Hey, Phill, Just checking in to get your further insight into the questions posed in my last posting. Also, earlier, you'd mentioned something about the HDDs PCB. Would love your insight when you've a moment. THX!

 

PBot


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#59
phillpower2

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RE: the bad HDD: What is "Puppy Linux"? Will that somehow help my PC recognize the HDD? Don't forget, the PC can't even recognize that it's attached.

 

 

As per my reply #2, if Puppy cannot mount the drive then it is most likely beyond end user repair I`m afraid :(  

 



Hello -PBot,

 

It may not be the HDD but attempting to back up your data quite rightfully should be done first, see Puppy Linux info below;

 

=================== 

***Required Hardware*** 

CD Burner (CDRW) Drive, 

Blank CD, 

Extra Storage Device (USB Flash Drive, External Hard Drive)  

=================== 

 

1. Save these files to your Desktop/Burn Your Live CD:

  • Download Latest Puppy Linux ISO (i.e.: lupu-528.iso) 

    Download BurnCDCC ISO Burning Software 

     

    There are instructions on how to boot from flash drive with puppy here; / 

     

    For computers that have UEFI as opposed to legacy BIOS, to be able to boot from your USB device you may need to disable secure boot and change UEFI to CSM Boot, not all computers and BIOS are the same, please refer to your user manual if you have one as the following steps are only one such example.

     

    Restart the computer, Windows 8 and 8.1 from the Start or desktop screen move your mouse pointer over the upper or lower right corner of the screen, when the Windows Charms appear click the Settings Charm, click on Power and then the Restart option.

     

    Windows 10, Click on Start,Power and then Restart.

     

    While the computer is re-starting,you will need to continually tap or hold down the particular key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer, we will use the F2 key as an example here;

     

    After restarting the computer, when the screen goes black, press and hold down the F2 key, wait for the BIOS to load.

     

    Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

    Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

    Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

    Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.

     

    If your computer will not boot into Windows at all, power up or restart the computer continually tap or hold down the key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer and then do the following;

     

    Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

    Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

    Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

    Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.

     

     

  • Open BurnCDCC with Windows Explorer 

  • Extract All files to a location you can remember 

  • Double Click 1%20BurnCDCC%20Icon.PNG BurnCDCC 

  • Click Browse 2%20BurnCDCC%20Browse%20Button.PNG and navigate to the Puppy Linux ISO file you just downloaded 

  • Open/Double Click that file 

    IMPORTANT: Adjust the speed bar to CD: 4x DVD: 1x 

  • Click Start 3%20BurnCDCC%20Start%20Button.PNG 

  • Your CD Burner Tray will open automatically 

  • Insert a blank CD and close the tray 

  • Click OK 

Puppy Linux Live CD will now be created 

 

2. Set your boot priority in the BIOS to CD-ROM first, Hard Drive Second 

  •  

  • Start the computer/press the power button 

  • Immediately start tapping the appropriate key to enter the BIOS, aka "Setup" 

    (Usually shown during the "Dell" screen, or "Gateway" Screen) 

  • Once in the BIOS, under Advanced BIOS Options change boot priority to: 

    CD-ROM 1st, Hard Drive 2nd 

  • Open your ROM drive and insert the disk 

  • Press F10 to save and exit 

  • Agree with "Y" to continue 

  • Your computer will restart and boot from the Puppy Linux Live CD 

     

    4%20BIOSBootPriorityImage.png 

 

 

 

3.  Recover Your Data 

  • Once Puppy Linux has loaded, it is actually running in your computer's Memory (RAM).  You will see a fully functioning Graphical User Interface similar to what you normally call "your computer".  Internet access may or may not be available depending on your machine, so it is recommended you print these instructions before beginning.  Also, double clicking is not needed in Puppy.  To expand, or open folders/icons, just click once.  Puppy is very light on resources, so you will quickly notice it is much speedier than you are used to.  This is normal.  Ready?  Let's get started. 

     

    3a. Mount Drives[list] 

  • Click the Mount Icon located at the top left of your desktop. 5%20Puppy%20Linux%20Mount%20Icon.PNG 

  • A Window will open.  By default, the "drive" tab will be forward/highlighted.  Click on Mount for your hard drive. 

  • Assuming you only have one hard drive and/or partition, there may be only one selection to mount. 

  • USB Flash Drives usually automatically mount upon boot, but click the "usbdrv" tab and make sure it is mounted. 

  • If using an external hard drive for the data recovery, do this under the "drive" tab.  Mount it now. 

 

3b. Transfer Files.

  •  

  • At the bottom left of your desktop a list of all hard drives/partitions, USB Drives, and Optical Drives are listed with a familiar looking hard drive icon. 

  • Open your old hard drive i.e. sda1 

  • Next, open your USB Flash Drive or External Drive. i.e. sdc or sdb1 

  • If you open the wrong drive, simply X out at the top right corner of the window that opens. (Just like in Windows) 

  • From your old hard drive, drag and drop whatever files/folders you wish to transfer to your USB Drive's Window. 

 

For The Novice:  The common path to your pictures, music, video, and documents folders for XP is: Documents and Settings >> All Users (or each individual name of each user, for Vista and above  C:\Users\$USERNAME\[...]. CHECK All Names!) >> Documents >> You will now see My Music, My Pictures, and My Videos

 

Remember to only click once!  No double clicking!  Once you drag and drop your first folder, you will notice a small menu will appear giving you the option to move or copy.  Choose COPY each time you drag and drop. 

 

YOU ARE DONE!!!  Simply click Menu >> Mouse Over Shutdown >> Reboot/Turn Off Computer.  Be sure to plug your USB Drive into another working windows machine to verify all data is there and transferred without corruption. Congratulations! 

 

 

 

PuppyLinux528screenshot.png 

 

you'd mentioned something about the HDDs PCB. 

 

 

You can normally tell if a PCB is bad, you get no signs of life at all from the HDD and if it has shorted out there is often scorch marks on the surface, some info for you here


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#60
Phlegmbot

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Hey, Phill! OK, I understand now. Will try Puppy -- I thought you'd recommended that when you thought it was just minor issues w/the HDD.

 

Yeah, there're no scorch marks or anything on the HDD...it looks clean...just effed up internally. Thx!


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