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Number notation used by Google


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#1
batpark

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Using Google to calculate (2^100) I get 1.2676506e+30. This means 1.2676506 * 10^30, right?

 

Why doesn't Google say so, I wonder? 

 

... batpark


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#2
RKinner

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And waste a few characters?
 

A calculator display showing the Avogadro constant in E notation
Most calculators and many computer programs present very large and very small results in scientific notation, typically invoked by a key labelled EXP (for exponent), EEX (for enter exponent), EE, EX, or E depending on vendor and model. Because superscripted exponents like 107 cannot always be conveniently displayed, the letter E or e is often used to represent "times ten raised to the power of" (which would be written as "× 10n") and is followed by the value of the exponent; in other words, for any two real numbers m and n, the usage of "mEn" would indicate a value of m × 10n. In this usage the character e is not related to the mathematical constant e or the exponential function ex (a confusion that is unlikely if scientific notation is represented by a capital E). Although the E stands for exponent, the notation is usually referred to as (scientific) E notation or (scientific) e notation, rather than (scientific) exponential notation. The use of E notation facilitates data entry and readability in textual communication since it minimizes keystrokes, avoids reduced font sizes and provides a simpler and more concise display, but it is not encouraged in publications.[3]
 
Examples and other notations[edit]
In most popular programming languages, 6.022E23 or 6.022e23 is equivalent to 6.022×1023, and 1.6×10−35 would be written 1.6e-35 (e.g. Ada, Analytica, C++, FORTRAN, MATLAB, Scilab, Perl, Java,[4] Python, Lua and JavaScript.)

 

 


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