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New to W 7. How do I include my 1TB HDD and place Folders & files


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#1
Rusty Wrex

Rusty Wrex

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Suffering from XP withdrawal symptoms. Can't see how to get at my new 1TB HDD? I.e. how do I make it 'visible' and put folders and files on it? Do I have to create it as a library? I am trying to relate XP's drive name e.g. 'D' drive on to which I could create folders and group files in folders.

I want to use the HDD the same way as I did my secondary (non system) drive with XP, to keep from cluttering my system (SSD) disc and as insurance against problems in the future and making backups easier.

So does 'drive' in XP equate to library?  But first I need to bring my HDD into the system to use it, then be able to access it which is where I assume we get into libraries?

I can see lots of menus about many things but nothing I can relate to, to get at my HDD, set up with / as a library / libraries ( ? ) and -- as an example -- use a USB stick to migrate folders / files from my old XP system on to my new HDD.

'Bill' is very good at inventing new names but relating / bridging old to new for those coming from XP is non existent.  My new system is Professional W 7. running on a dual core ASUS Z97-P motherboard. Simple clear help would be greatly appreciated, then I can trade in my white stick for a flashlight !

Rusty.


Edited by Rusty Wrex, 10 June 2017 - 10:25 AM.

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#2
paws

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Hi Rusty Wrex, and welcome to our forums>

:welcome:

 

Sorry to hear of the problems you are experiencing with the transition from Win XP to Win 7

Its not easy, but hopefully we will be able to guide you in the right direction.

 

As I'm only using Win 10 now, I'll set up a Win Xp machine and also a Win 7 machine, so I can provide some "step by steps" that should actually work!

 

It will take me a couple of hours to set things up and as soon as its all ready I'll get back to you, in the meantime can you post back with the make model number of your computer?

Regards

paws


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#3
paws

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Hi rusty Wrex,
I have now set up an XP and a Win 7 machine, so hopefully I will be able to guide you along the right path.

1 My first suggestion is for you to forget entirely about libraries for the moment! (some folks swear by them whilst others swear at them!) Just ignore them for the time being, and once you are happy at finding your folders and moving stuff to and from your hard drive and Win 7 has become second nature to use, then that's to time to experiment with them if you particularly want to. There is no need to use libraries unless you want to... Just make sure that you do not click on anything to do with libraries!

2 On your Win 7 computer:
1 click on the start button ( bottom left corner of your screen) and then
2 click on the menu item labelled Computer, you should see your boot drive ( SSD) usually labelled C and your 1Tb hard drive that will probably be labelled D or maybe E..... look at the size shown to be sure you have identified correctly your 1Tb hard drive

3 click on that drive letter that is your 1TB hard drive and it will open so you can see what files are on there.

 

Post back and let us know how you get on together with any questions you have.

Regards

paws


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#4
Rusty Wrex

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Hi Rusty Wrex, and welcome to our forums>

:welcome:

 

Sorry to hear of the problems you are experiencing with the transition from Win XP to Win 7

Its not easy, but hopefully we will be able to guide you in the right direction.

 


As I'm only using Win 10 now, I'll set up a Win Xp machine and also a Win 7 machine, so I can provide some "step by steps" that should actually work!

 

It will take me a couple of hours to set things up and as soon as its all ready I'll get back to you, in the meantime can you post back with the make model number of your computer?

Regards

paws

 

Thanks Paws, I might seem thicker than a lorry load of dried pig manure but one of the first things I did i.e. in the first five minutes, was to use 'Computer' to look at the volumes i.e. discs on my system. Which only shows my 'C' drive, DVD and a flash USB 'disk' I have but NOT my 1TB auxiliary. I have found my 1TB disc physically present on the system -- can't recall precisely where -- I have spent over a day at least wandering around countless menus via Control Panel and many others whether relevant or not, but I can't see what SHOULD be a plain, straight forward simple  means and menu to identify the disc to the system, and incorporate it with a letter identifier be it E, F, G, Y, or Z. Or anything else.

This isn't rocket science and neither should be picking up the disc and making it 'system visible' and hence accessible. 

Think I'm going to have to go back to the chap who built it for me, because there is NO means of doing what is elementary. I can't afford to keep on wasting time.

I'm afraid the Bill Gates and generally the American approach to information organisation and everything from psychology to welding sets is one flat level. Whereas the European approach is hierarchical and contextual, meaning relationships between objects and LEVELS of information or hardware are functionally related. As a hardware engineer and troubleshooter and hardware and software instructor for years working for Honeywell using American course material, used to drive our instructors mad because course notes were a dogs breakfast of information lacking in structure and cohesion. In fact 'new' course material was not unusually bits of old course sandwiched in with new material with no consistency of information presentation either technically of graphically, making it a nightmare to teach.

If you look at a Caterpillar tractor engine it has bits bolted all over the place. It works extremely well but in comparison to a similar Mercedes engine the latter is a model of functional neatness.

Hence also the difference between the Bill Gates and Apple.

I've seen American welding sets, which are also a rats nest of wiring which also work extremely well whereas an Italian welder is beautifully laid out inside. And talking to a psychologist -- who was also my boss at one time -- he told me American psychology is 'flat' in its organisation whereas European psychology is structured, layered and contextual meaning that topics have clear RELATIONSHIPS.

There is nothing in W7 grouping activities by function e.g. disc management and a tree structure beneath guiding a user through levels of operations, their relationship, and from simple to complex and detailed. IT is the menu 'sausage machine' with NO context.

I'm not a Bill Gates menu diagnostician nor do I wish to become one. More Apple and less 'Bill' would be very welcome.

 

Rusty

 

 

 

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#5
paws

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Hi Rusty Wrex

Ok all understood

:thumbsup:

 

A likely cause of "Computer" not being able to "see" your 1TB hard drive is that maybe its not connected, or has somehow become disconnected?

It might be wise to check its connections before going further.

 

The system builder may have some other ideas, but these are the things I would check first if it came into our workshop.

 

1 If the 1Tb hard drive is USB then make sure its power supply is working Ok....(using a voltmeter on the output should show a constant 5v)

2 If its USB and powered from  USB port make sure that you are using known good working USB ports ( a 1Tb will normally need to be powered by 2 USB ports)

3 If its an IDE drive then check the connector to the mobo is securely corrected and the Molex is fully engaged.

4 If its a SATA drive then do the checks as in 3 but obviously the data connector and the SATA power connector are totally different.

5 If its a SCSI (Scusi) then post back as many mobo's do not support this "out of the box"

6 I'm not sure if you have already initialised the 1Tb hard drive and its formatted ready for use and maybe has data on it already, or if its totally new and needs initialising, (please advise)

7 Can you open a Command prompt and execute the following command from a E prompt and then if no joy from a F prompt

dir /w

press enter.

you should then see a wide (landscape view) of your drive associated with the drive letter concerned)

8 Finally if still no joy, check to see if its being recognised in the BIOS/UEFI

 

If the results of the above are all negative then its indicating a disconnected or defective drive

Presumably you have checked the drive in another known good working machine?

 

Regards

paws


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#6
Rusty Wrex

Rusty Wrex

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Hi Rusty Wrex, and welcome to our forums>

:welcome:

 

Sorry to hear of the problems you are experiencing with the transition from Win XP to Win 7

Its not easy, but hopefully we will be able to guide you in the right direction.

 


As I'm only using Win 10 now, I'll set up a Win Xp machine and also a Win 7 machine, so I can provide some "step by steps" that should actually work!

 

It will take me a couple of hours to set things up and as soon as its all ready I'll get back to you, in the meantime can you post back with the make model number of your computer?

Regards

paws

 

Thanks Paws, I might seem thicker than a lorry load of dried pig manure but one of the first things I did i.e. in the first five minutes, was to use 'Computer' to look at the volumes i.e. discs on my system. Which only shows my 'C' drive, DVD and a flash USB 'disk' I have but NOT my 1TB auxiliary. I have found my 1TB disc physically present on the system -- can't recall precisely where -- I have spent over a day at least wandering around countless menus via Control Panel and many others whether relevant or not, but I can't see what SHOULD be a plain, straight forward simple  means and menu to identify the disc to the system, and incorporate it with a letter identifier be it E, F, G, Y, or Z. Or anything else.

This isn't rocket science and neither should be picking up the disc and making it 'system visible' and hence accessible. 

Think I'm going to have to go back to the chap who built it for me, because there is NO means of doing what is elementary. I can't afford to keep on wasting time.

I'm afraid the Bill Gates and generally the American approach to information organisation and everything from psychology to welding sets is one flat level. Whereas the European approach is hierarchical and contextual, meaning relationships between objects and LEVELS of information or hardware are functionally related. As a hardware engineer and troubleshooter and hardware and software instructor for years working for Honeywell using American course material, used to drive our instructors mad because course notes were a dogs breakfast of information lacking in structure and cohesion. In fact 'new' course material was not unusually bits of old course sandwiched in with new material with no consistency of information presentation either technically of graphically, making it a nightmare to teach.

If you look at a Caterpillar tractor engine it has bits bolted all over the place. It works extremely well but in comparison to a similar Mercedes engine the latter is a model of functional neatness.

Hence also the difference between the Bill Gates and Apple.

I've seen American welding sets, which are also a rats nest of wiring which also work extremely well whereas an Italian welder is beautifully laid out inside. And talking to a psychologist -- who was also my boss at one time -- he told me American psychology is 'flat' in its organisation whereas European psychology is structured, layered and contextual meaning that topics have clear RELATIONSHIPS.

There is nothing in W7 grouping activities by function e.g. disc management and a tree structure beneath guiding a user through levels of operations, their relationship, and from simple to complex and detailed. IT is the menu 'sausage machine' with NO context.

I'm not a Bill Gates menu diagnostician nor do I wish to become one. More Apple and less 'Bill' would be very welcome.

 

Rusty

 

 

Hello again Paws,

    Assuming I'm typing in the right place.

I'm Pleased to say I have 'found' the 1TB HDD. And where the sub sub menu is to a) allocate a drive letter and b) to bring it into my file system.

I wish I could say it was clear and coherent. 

Its not difficult but it is horribly obscured by the 'Bill mentality'  string of information sausages.

I finally found what I wanted to do through the Control Panel ---> Administrative Tools -----> Computer Management -----> Disc Management -----> Create VHD (whatever 'VHD' means??? --Virtual Hard Disc I imagine?) Give it a drive name e.g. 'F'

That was after discovering I had named the 'System Reserved' area as 'G.' Which of course isn't explained.

After that I got into Computer Management -------> Disc Management ------> Actions (again) ------> Attach VHD (I think).

Easy when you already understand the system and completely lacking in context when you don't. It could so easily make Disc management a functional title which when clicked on displays a Heading 'How To' and below it a list of ALL disc management functions and click on the one desired. Thereby creating context within function.

'Computer Management' is superfluous. Organising discs it what its about. 

But then as Bill was well known to say in software design review meetings: "That's the most stupidest way of doing it I've ever heard." (Quote in an article on the W8 pigs breakfast) Given Bill's use of double superlatives its hardly surprising 'Bill English' demonstrates the same disregard with software for elegance, context and function.

 

Many thanks for your help. It IS appreciated.

 

          Regards

 

          Rusty

 

 

 

 

 

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<script type="text/javascript"> //</script>


Edited by Rusty Wrex, 12 June 2017 - 07:40 AM.

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#7
paws

paws

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Hi Rusty

Glad you got it fixed

:thumbsup:

Regards

paws


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