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Remotely controlled phone


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#1
Rebeccabarnhart37

Rebeccabarnhart37

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My phone was some how being remotely controlled. There was fake Google results for my searches and my WiFi wouldn't turn off. People got messages from me I didn't send. Anyone know how I can find out who did it? Or prove that it happened? Would my phone company be able to tell?
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#2
UnloosedCake

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This is certainly an interesting scenario you're faced with here. Let me try a bit to explain what might have happened first, and then how you might be able to fix it.

 

Most often, when devices are 'hacked' it's software that resides on the device that is truly infected, usually specific applications or services. I know personally I've had my Google and Yahoo accounts hacked, which led to emails being sent that I didn't draft, and lots of lengthy apologies to friends and family. 

 

Hacking phones, and I mean truly hacking phones is usually not done/seen/experienced by anyone. This is because of one simple reason: it's not worth it. The time and effort that goes in to finding bugs/exploits for OSs just doesn't compare to the payout anyone gets from going after them. Aside from nation-state level events, the every day user won't experience their actual phone software (i.e iOS or Android) being hacked any time soon, at least, remotely. 

 

I'd suggest taking a look at exactly what went wrong, was it your email that went a little wonky? Did WhatsApp send a few messages you know weren't you? Once you figure out exactly what happened, it's a bit easier to take a look back and figure out what the common denominator is between them: is it a shared Google login? Microsoft ID? Did you use the same password for everything that got compromised? 

 

If you believe your phone's OS has been truly hacked, take a look at our mobile virus/malware/spyware forum, maybe they can be of a bit of help as far as how to go about getting rid of this problem. 

 

Contacting your phone's manufacturer or your phone service provider is always a good option, especially if there were charges made on your account that you want to dispute, be it for data usage, calls, etc. 

 

 

Hope this helped, at least a little bit!


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