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Drop in Speed after changing contract with same supplier

speed wired router

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#1
maddog10

maddog10

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I have just changed my Dads internet package(went live 3-4 weeks ago) for something cheaper and now the internet speed has dropped from 3.7 Mbps to 1.75 - 2.66Mbps. This is the wired speed and I'm not bothered about the wifi speed, just the speed on the desktop which my dad uses.

 

We were with Talktalk for the broadband on an old Aol account and Aol router. With BT for the phone and landline. Now we are Totally with Talktalk and got a new Dlink DSL-3782 router.

 

Funny thing is nothing has really changed except the router. Same company for internet as before, but it gets slower. Does it make any difference changing a router for wired internet speed?

 

The package is the standard 17Mbps you get and its not possible to get fibre in our area.

 

Any thoughts thanks.


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#2
paws

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Hi maddog10,
Sorry to hear about the slowdown following your switch to talktalk as your isp.

Here are some thoughts for you:
1 check that your router/modem is plugged into the BT master socket and not a subsidiary socket ( most BT modern sockets have a horizontal line across them moulded into the plastic indicating its the master)

2 Make sure that all telephone sockets throughout the premises have a filter( ADSL) plugged in and make sure that any splitters used are plugged into the filter and not the BT socket.

3 Perform a speed test when just using your browser and with no other devices using your broaqdband at the time...write down both the download and upload speed and post them here.

4 unplug your router/modem from the BT master socket remove the two screws from the front face of the BT master socket and gently, very gently ease the faceplate back and plug the filter and then the router modem directly into the test socket that lies immediately behind the face plate

5 Repeat the speed test and report the figures here.

6 if no improvement then get talktalk to check the line and broadband speed themselves.

Let us know your results
Regards
paws
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#3
maddog10

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Paws

Hi there I will do that, but will have to reply in a couple of days to a week as I don't live with my Dad and will need to wait until I visit next. Its unlikely its plugged into the master socket, but then its the same socket upstairs in a back bedroom that was always used.


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#4
paws

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OK all understood,

Don't worry, we don't close topics here on this forum (as a rule!)

 

Turning now to the use of the router/modem whilst plugged into a non BT master socket.... whilst, as your Dad has found, it can sometimes be made to work this way, but it is strongly recommended that only the master socket be used for this to provide reliable consistent and the best speed performance from the equipment

 

Using a subsidiary socket is generally a very bad idea, leading to slow downs and inconsistent performance...... whilst making house calls I have from time to time come across customers who were unwilling ( for convenience reasons) to plug into the master socket, citing access /wiring issues that they were unwilling to address, and that's their decision of course, however if they want the best performance possible from their network then they should follow the recommendations.

 

Talktalk in their information sheets and customer booklets make specific reference to this as do practically all ISPs and manufacturers of modems/routers.

 

Subsidiary sockets are fine for telephony transmissions but were not generally designed for data carriage, hence the degradation in performance when using them for data. Different modems routers will differ slightly in their performance characteristics when used in the non approved way.

 

The check using the Bt test socket ( behind the faceplace) mentioned in step 4 in my previous post is designed to rule out internal house wiring and subsidiary socket/wiring issues with the upstairs or other subsidiary sockets throughout the house

 

If the speed readings are consistently similar when using the BT test socket to those currently being obtained through a subsidiary socket then it has ruled out most potential house wiring/ socket issues "downstream" of the BT master socket.

 

Let us know ( when you can) how you get on.

Regards

paws


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#5
maddog10

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Just back from my Dads. I did everything below and also using the old router. Sadly I did not get time to contact Talktalk or play about with the routers settings. I tested the connection with the master socket downstairs using my laptop wired in.

1)Routers on a subsidiary socket

2)All checked

3)Speeds, New router 2.55 down, 0.57 up, old router 2.54 down, 0.62 up

4)Connection into master socket - Done

5)Speeds, New router - 2.56 down, 0.64 up, old router 2.60 down ,0.60 up

 

I've edited the quote below btw guess to be more concise in my old language. Hope thats ok.

1 check that your router/modem is plugged into the BT master socket and not a subsidiary socket\

2 All telephone sockets have a filter( ADSL) plugged in and make sure that any splitters used are plugged into the filter and not the BT socket.

3 Perform a speed test when just using your browser and with no other devices

4 Plug the filter and then the router modem directly into the master sockets test socket that lies immediately behind the face plate

5 Repeat the speed test and report the figures here.

Let us know your results
Regards
paws


Edited by maddog10, 15 October 2017 - 05:01 PM.

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#6
paws

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Hi maddog10,

The figures you quote for the speeds are quite interesting in that they show no real difference twixt the speed obtained when plugged into the master socket and that when in the subsidiary socket..... that would tend to suggest that the subsidiary socket wiring in your Dad's house is in reasonable shape.

 

It's not clear from your reply if you were plugged into the test socket (behind the faceplate) when using the BT master socket. if not then this would be the next step for you to take before contacting talktalk for a check of the line  to see if the speeds you are getting now are in accordance with your agreement with them, taking into account the distance/length of wiring twixt your Dad's house and the telephone exchange.

 

Internet speeds are of course dynamic in that they depend on a multitude of factors that tend to show different speeds for different times of the day, different computers used ( you mention that you used a laptop) rather than your Dad's desktop computer for the speed tests and the number of folks locally who are trying to connect at the same time, and the bandwidth being used..... ( some folks may be downloading massive video files, music, etc., whereas some households have just one person sometimes fairly elderly who may not be interested in downloading music and videos and who mainly use their computers for email and obtaining information from the web, whereas others may have teenage children who all have various devices that are almost constantly being used down loading large files and maybe even using torrents and the like.

 

Does your father find any particular problems with the speeds being obtained now, compared with his previous set up?

 

For a typical more senior person using mainly email and searching the web for information, the effects of a reduction of speed from 3.5 to 2.5 mbps would be hardly noticeable..... however for a heavy user then it would be fairly significant.

 

Let us know what talktalk have to say.

Regards

paws


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#7
maddog10

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Hello. Yes I had used the test socket housed within the master socket and in general my dad noticed its slower, but still useable so he is not that bothered.

I just wanted to know if the router would be making the difference, which it does not appear to be. I also wanted to know why its slower when its the same internet provider on the basic account as it was before. Now I will play with its setting and phone Talktalk


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#8
paws

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:thumbsup:


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