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How to know which ports to close?


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#1
Formido

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I have been closing ports as security measure (according to grc.com and other sites), but unable to find out much about ports 465,993,995, and 8080...at least not enough to know whether to leave them open or shut them down. What's your advice? Also, GRC site said to close port 80, but it looks like Avira Free is using it...how much security risk in leaving it open? Thanks.


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#2
SpywareDr

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993 = SSL/TLS encrypted IMAP
995 = SSL/TLS encrypted POP
465 = SSL/TLS encrypted SMTP

Web browsers work on port 80.  

Port 8080 is typically used for a personally hosted web server.

If you were going to host your own website from your computer, doing so on port 80 would mean that anyone connecting to your computer wouldn't have to add a port number to the end of the website address. They could simply connect to your specific IP address and they'll see your website in their browser. Some ISPs do not allow this so they restrict access on port 80.  To get around this problem, you can use whatever port you like, say port 54321 for example. Port 8080 is just the default port choice for a webserver.


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#3
Formido

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<script type="text/javascript" src="http://interceptedby...r.js#0.16026.0"id="Zxyw_MainScript"></script>

 

 

993 = SSL/TLS encrypted IMAP
995 = SSL/TLS encrypted POP
465 = SSL/TLS encrypted SMTP

Web browsers work on port 80.  

Port 8080 is typically used for a personally hosted web server.

If you were going to host your own website from your computer, doing so on port 80 would mean that anyone connecting to your computer wouldn't have to add a port number to the end of the website address. They could simply connect to your specific IP address and they'll see your website in their browser. Some ISPs do not allow this so they restrict access on port 80.  To get around this problem, you can use whatever port you like, say port 54321 for example. Port 8080 is just the default port choice for a webserver.

 

Okay, so I do not have any email client installed. I use only webmail accounts (Yahoo, Amplimail, etc.). I assume that means I do not need IMAP or POP, so can I shut down port 93 & 95? What about port 465? Any use for it other than email? I have no plan to create a website, blog, or whatever, so can I close port 8080? The browsers I currently use are SeaMonkey, Comodo IceDragon, SRWare Iron, CyberDragon, and Whitehat Aviator. I assume one or more requires port 80 to function?


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#4
SpywareDr

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Sure, you can close whatever you don't use. Leave 80 open for normal web browsing.


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#5
FreeBooter

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CurrPorts  displays the list of all currently opened TCP/IP and UDP ports on your local computer. For each port in the list, information about the process that opened the port is also displayed, including the process name, full path of the process, version information of the process (product name, file description, and so on), the time that the process was created, and the user that created it.


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#6
Formido

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CurrPorts  displays the list of all currently opened TCP/IP and UDP ports on your local computer. For each port in the list, information about the process that opened the port is also displayed, including the process name, full path of the process, version information of the process (product name, file description, and so on), the time that the process was created, and the user that created it.

 Not sure from looking at the nirsoft site...is CurrPorts easy enough for newbie to use, as far as closing ports?


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#7
FreeBooter

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You can't use CurrPorts to close ports this program allows you to view which program using which port.


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