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Transfer Window 10 from hdd desktop to ssd

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#1
kensam

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Hello, i am really newbie to this forum, so i am really sorry if this kind of question already being asked here. So here my situation.

 

I already installed Window 10 on my desktop via HDD. But the thing is, i want to transfer the whole thing into a SSD, is that possible? I mean i want to replace all HDD in my desktop to SSD. I do not want to format it like always people do.

 

I mean when it is already transferred from HDD to SSD, then when i put back the SSD inside the desktop then i switch on my PC, everything is normal (i mean all the previous setting)

 

Sorry for my English. Hope you understand what i am trying to say.


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#2
paws

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Hi kensam.

Your English is just fine!

 

An easy way to achieve your objective would be to make an "image" or a clone, of your hard drive, using for example something like Macrium Reflect Free or any other image/cloning software.

 

When buying an SSD such software is sometimes included in the package.

 

If you wanted to take a look at Macrium then here's the link:

 

https://www.macrium.com/reflectfree

 

(The free version would be perfectly adequate for your purposes)

 

I would recommend strongly that you also create a "recovery disc" when using this or any other similar tool, as it might be a help in enabling your computer to boot satisfactorily once the SSD is put into everyday use. (There is usually a "wizard" to guide you through the process of making the recovery disc.)

 

There are of course many similar disc/imaging cloning tools available; some are "paid for" products, whilst others like Macrium have a Free version

 

Regards

paws


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#3
SleepyDude

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Hi,

 

One important question is how big is your HDD and the SSD?

 

Do you know how many partitions you have on the HDD? you can find this using the Windows Disk Manager.


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#4
kensam

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Actually i have 2 HDD within my PC, 1 for my system only another 1 for entertainment only, the only concern  is all about HDD that contain all the system running. And i think, it is just around maybe 100GB or above like that, i am not fully check it because of i installed a lot of games, need to  uninstalled unwanted things. And my SSD is 120GB.

 

So from my point of understanding, it is possible to do a fully clone. Clone everything from HDD to SSD. Then remove the HDD and put the SSD. Switch on the PC, then BAM! everything just like normal. I might give a try and see the result.

 

Thanks for your help paws


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#5
123Runner

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If I may. An image and a clone are 2 different entities. An image is a snapshot of the drive that can be used to restore the drive to the configuration it was at when you took the image. An image can be stored on another drive or a DVD. You would use the image and restore it to the SSD.

A clone is an exact copy of your drive. You "clone" your HDD to the SSD. At that time you have 2 drives that are exact copies. You just swap the drives.

 

A clone or an image will work for you because the SSD is bigger than the HDD.

Either way you should create a boot disc from the program you use.

Easeus Todo backup is also a good and free program to use.


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