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Laptop Won't Boot

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Best Answer robkbriggs , 21 May 2018 - 08:51 AM

Ok, then you can close this thread. Go to the full post »


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#1
robkbriggs

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I've got an HP laptop that a friend asked me to look at. She said that starting a couple of months ago, it wouldn't boot into Windows. It's an HP Envy 17t. The behavior that I'm seeing is that when you turn the machine on, it shows the HP splash screen during post, and just has the little circle going around and around.  If you try turning it off and on enough, you may see it trying to do an automatic repair, but that always fails.

 

I've tried going into a command prompt, and trying the various bootrec options, but no luck so far.

 

I could just back the information up on it, and reformat, but if possible I'd like to avoid that to avoid having to reinstall all of the programs, preferences, etc.Or at least get it up long enough to clone the info to another hdd.

 

Is it possible to get the thing booting at least long enough to do that?

 

 

Thanks,

Rob


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#2
FreeBooter

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Please boot your computer with Windows Installation DVD and from Windows Recovery Environment start the Command Prompt.

 

Please type below commands into Command Prompt one at time and press Enter key.

 

Following command will fixes errors on the disk and locates bad sectors and recovers readable information.

Chkdsk D: /r

 

The following command scans integrity of all protected Windows system files and repairs files with problems when possible.

 

Sfc  /Scannow   /OFFBOOTDIR=D:\   /OFFWINDIR=D:\Windows

 

Please replace partition letter D: with Windows installed partition letter.  When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.

 

 

Lets check connected hard disk health by executing following command:

wmic diskdrive get status

Please reboot your computer when you have finish executing above commands and let us have the output of the commands.


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#3
robkbriggs

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I don't have an installation DVD, it was upgraded from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10, and I'm not even sure where the original media is. I do have a Windows 10 recovery USB, though.

 

The boot drive is an SSD, do you still want me to follow the same commands?

 

Thanks,

Rob


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#4
FreeBooter

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You said you have executed few command from Command Prompt do same with these commands:

 

You only to change /r switch like this Chkdsk D:  /f

 

Execute other commands as they are don't forget to replace D: drive letter with Windows install partition drive letter.


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#5
robkbriggs

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Here are the results

 

Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" 
 
osdevice partition=C:
 
 
 
Chkdsk C: /r
 
Windows has scanned the file system and found no problem.
No further aciton required.
 
 
 
Sfc  /Scannow   /OFFBOOTDIR=C:\   /OFFWINDIR=C:\Windows
 
Windows Resource protection did not find any integrity violations
 
 
 
wmic diskdrive get status
 
Status
OK
OK

 


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#6
FreeBooter

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Are you still having same boot issue after restarting Windows?


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#7
robkbriggs

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Yes.


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#8
FreeBooter

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It's hard to figure out what could be the cause of the boot issue as computer does not provide any error message.


Windows Vista/ 7/8/8.1/10 keep a regular backup of the registry handy in case you need to overwrite a corrupted registry. By default, the RegIdleBackup task runs every 10 days, so that’s as far back as you would lose if you replaced the current registry with the automatically backed-up files. You can find the backed-up registry files in \Windows\System32\config\RegBack folder.

From Windows Recovery Environment start the Command Prompt.

Please type below command into Command Prompt and press Enter key.

 Dir C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack

Above command will list files stored within RegBack folder and there file size, make sure files are not zero size if they are do not follow below instructions.

akBT8zC.png

Please replace partition letter C: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.

Please type below commands into Command Prompt and for each command you have typed press Enter key.



Replace C:\Windows\System32\Config\RegBack\*     C:\Windows\System32\Config
As files are replaced, the Command Prompt displays their filenames on the screen.

This procedure assumes that Windows Vista/7/8/8.1/10 is installed to the C:\ partition. Make sure to replace C:\ drive letter to the appropriate Windows OS installed partition drive letter if it is a different location.

Restart your computer.


Above commands renames the registry files at their existing location, and then copies the registry files from the RegBack folder to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder.
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#9
robkbriggs

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That made no difference, the laptop still is not booting into Windows.

 

Now, instead of hanging on the HP splash screen indefinitely, it seems to be staying there for a few minutes, then retrying again. this continues over and over.


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#10
FreeBooter

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From Windows Recovery Environment start the Command Prompt.

Please type below commands into Command Prompt and press Enter key.

Following commands will repair Master Boot Record (MBR), Boot Sector and BCD Store.

 
Bootrec /FixMbr

Bootrec  /FixBoot

Bootrec /scanos

Bootrec  /RebuildBcd

Have you make sure files size of the backups of registry hives are not zero size?

Edited by FreeBooter, 08 May 2018 - 09:53 AM.

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#11
robkbriggs

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I've already done those commands, without luck, as I indicated in the original post.

 

Yes, I made sure the file sizes of the backups of the registry hives were not zero. 


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#12
FreeBooter

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You only said you executed few Bootrec command which once's you have not told us also it would be very helpful if give us the output of these commands.
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#13
robkbriggs

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I said I tried the various bootrec commands, not a few of them. I didn't think it was necessary to list each, as I'm unaware of more than the four listed above. 

 

This is the output I received when running them this time;

 

 
bootrec /fixmbr
 
The operation completed successfully
 
 
bootrec /fixboot
 
The operations completed successfully
 
 
bootrec /scanos
 
Successfully scanned windows Windows instllations.
total identified Windows installations: 0
The operation completed successfully.
 
 
bootrec /rebuildbcd
 
Successfully scanned windows Windows instllations.
total identified Windows installations: 0
The operation completed successfully.

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#14
FreeBooter

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It's important that we know which once of the commands you have executed and there outputs. Looking at the output of Bootrec command System cannot found the Windows installation.


At the Command Prompt, type below command as shown and then press Enter:

bcdedit /export C:\bcdbackup
The bcdedit command is used here to export the BCD store as a file: bcdbackup. There's no need to specify a file extension.

The command should return the following on screen:
The operation completed successfully.

Meaning the BCD export worked as expected.


At this point, you need to adjust several file attributes for the BCD store so you can manipulate it. At the prompt, execute the attrib command exactly like this:

attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s
What you just did with the attrib command was remove the hidden, read-only, and system attributes from the file bcd. Those attributes restricted the actions you could take on the file. Now that they're gone, you can manipulate the file more freely - specifically, rename it.

To rename the BCD store, execute the ren command as shown:

ren C:\boot\bcd   bcd.old
Now that the BCD store is renamed, you should now be able to successfully rebuild it.

Try rebuilding the BCD again by executing the following, followed by Enter:

bootrec /scanos
bootrec /rebuildbcd
If there were not errors restart your computer after rebuilding the BCD store. If there was error when executing any one of the commands please post the error message.
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#15
robkbriggs

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These are the results I received;

 

bcdedit /export C:\bcdbackup

 

The operation completed successfully.

 

 

attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s

 

Path not found - C:\boot


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