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"You are running out of disk space on Local Disk G: ...." pop-

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#1
batpark

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I am getting this pop-up notice frequently on my W10 Dell desktop.

 

Is there a way to freeze the notices so I can actually read the whole message? Right now, they disappear after just  a few seconds?

 

Likely, I'll be back for substantive help later. But for now, I just want to read the whole MS message (or is it from Dell ?)

 

Thank you. .... batpark


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#2
dmccoy

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This is a known error caused by the latest update. It adds a drive letter to the WinRE partition. To fix perform the following:

 
Type command to start searching the menu
Right click on Command Prompt from menu
Select to Run As Administrator
Once in Command Prompt Windows then type of copy and paste each of the commands followed by Enter. 
 
Note: (The 'Volume and Disk Letter may be different on your system so make sure to select the correct ones. If any questions provide a screen shot after list volume)
 
diskpart 
list volume 
select volume 1 
remove letter=G

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#3
batpark

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dmccoy: Finally, I am getting around to this problem, can't keep putting it off. As you can see, I am not at all comfortable with these things.

 

For example. HOW do I "Type command to start searching the menu" ? WHERE do I type "command"?

 

Thanks for your patience.   batpark


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#4
dmccoy

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Click on Start menu
Type command to start searching
Right click on command prompt in list and select Run Administrator

Then enter the commands.
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#5
batpark

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dmccoy: I'm afraid I still need more hand-holding..

 

1. I was not able to follow your suggested two first steps (need clarification where I type "command" and how to get a Command Prompt that I can right-click)

 

2. FWIW, though, when I go to File Explorer\Local Drive G: I see that drive G: has only 36.5MB free (out of 449MB). But when I seek to see what files are there, I get a "This folder is empty." ???.

 

3. Also FWIW, I can get to the DOS-like Command Prompt, G:>. But the G:> would not respond to "list volume" command or the other commands you asked me to run.

 

Again, thanks for your patience.

 

By the way, WHAT HAPPENS when I use up the few remaining free MBs?

 

... batpark


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#6
dmccoy

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1. See the following link for more information on how to access command prompt as Admin

https://www.howtogee...in-windows-8.1/

 

2. Yes, this is the Windows Recovery partition and is suppose to be hidden without a driver letter. Which is what we are trying to fix.

 

3. After access the Command prompt using steps above. Then you will be at the following location which is where you want to start entering the commands below so it will look like as follows

 

c:\windows\system32\

c:\windows\system32\diskpart

 

diskpart 
list volume 
select volume 1 
remove letter=G
 

Edited by dmccoy, 02 September 2018 - 02:08 PM.

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#7
batpark

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dmccoy: Let me try once again to resolve this issue. (I gave up before because I was running into endless small issues that I could not adequately explain.)

 

I <think> the attached is what you suggested I do and report back to you.

 

Is my affected disk the G disk? Should I now complete the last two steps (select volume 1 and remove letter = G)?

 

Will those 4 steps really resolve the problem or is that just the beginning of the fix?

 

....batpark

 

 

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  • Sshot1015.png

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#8
batpark

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Doc, dmccoy: I am afraid I am still thrashing about here, still looking for the life peserver ---- but let me press on.

 

1. Doc: I tried to expand the DOS-like printout I sent yesterday -- by taking a full-screen screenshot. I am attaching it FWIW. But I fear I am not send the opening part of the listing that preceded what you see here. FWIW, the response to the command dir C:\cmd.exe /a /s took the pc several minutes to run. Is that what it should have done?

 

Does it tell you what you wanted to know or not?

 

2. Doc and dmccoy: You will recall that my overall aim here is to clear that "You are running out of memory on the G-drive warning." that I got.

 

Earlier in this thread (before I ran into all this extraneous trouble with cmd.exe) GtGer dmccoy recommended that I get to the Command Prompt and then issue these commands:

c:\windows\system32\

c:\windows\system32\diskpart

 

diskpart and Enter

list volume and Enter

select volume1 and Enter

remove letter = G and Enter

 

Is that still what I should be trying to do? Is that ALL I have to do, or is that just the start of a longer process?

 

Hoping to hear from you. .... batpark

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • screenshot1016.png

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#9
dmccoy

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Yes that is all that is needed to fix that issue. Make sure you verify and input the correct drive letter if it is different from G. If you need further guidance let me know.


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#10
batpark

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dmccoy: When I get into DOS-like commands I get uptight, as if I were running a nuclear reactor, so let me spell out what I understand you are suggesting.

 

1. I get the Command Prompt screen on my desktop. It looks like

C:\Users\801>    (Do I have the right Command Prompt? Near as I can recall I was never queried about Adminstrator.)

 

2. I can change it to

C:\Windows\System32>

 

3. I understand that you then want me to run these commands, one at a time (not chained) . Is that right? That is: first run:

 

C:\Windows\System32>diskpart

Enter

 

Then run

C:\Windows\System32>list volume

Enter

 

Then run

C:\Windows\System32>select volume 1

Enter

 

Then run

C:\Windows\System32>remove letter = G

Enter

 

4. Have I got that right?

 

When I look at C:\Windows\System32>dir I do not see the command "list volume", or "select volume 1", or "remove letter = G" ... so I wonder if I really am understanding you.

 

I surely welcome your comments and directions.

 

.... batpark


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#11
dmccoy

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I understand DOS command can be a little is really harmless as all it is doing is hiding your drive letter.
 

A couple things to clear up. You want to start command prompt as Administrator as follows.
 

Click on Start menu

Type command to start searching

Right click on command prompt in list and select Run Administrator

https://www.howtogee...in-windows-8.1/

 

When you start it as Administrator it will start in the C:\Windows\System32> directory. Which is why it will look as follows

 

C:\Windows\System32>

(If it looks like you show above C:\Users\801, it means it is not being ran as Administrator)

 

3. I understand that you then want me to run these commands, one at a time (not chained) . Is that right? That is: first run:

 

Yes you enter each one at a time and hit the Enter key

 

 

The following is exactly how your commands should look: The commands are in Red. Do not type the Notes in Green.

 

 

Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.17134.345]
© 2018 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
 
C:\WINDOWS\system32>diskpart
 
Microsoft DiskPart version 10.0.17134.1
 
Copyright © Microsoft Corporation.
On computer: DELLXPS13
 
DISKPART> list volume
 
  Volume ###  Ltr  Label        Fs     Type        Size     Status     Info
  ----------  ---  -----------  -----  ----------  -------  ---------  --------
  Volume 0                      NTFS   Partition    499 MB  Healthy
  Volume 1     C                NTFS   Partition    237 GB  Healthy    Boot
  Volume 2     G                FAT32  Partition     99 MB  Healthy    System
 
DISKPART> select volume 2
 
Volume 2 is the selected volume.
 
DISKPART> remove letter=G
 
DiskPart successfully removed the drive letter or mount point.
 
DISKPART> list volume (this is to show that the drive letter has been removed)
 
  Volume ###  Ltr  Label        Fs     Type        Size     Status     Info
  ----------  ---  -----------  -----  ----------  -------  ---------  --------
  Volume 0                      NTFS   Partition    499 MB  Healthy
  Volume 1     C                NTFS   Partition    237 GB  Healthy    Boot
* Volume 2                      FAT32  Partition     99 MB  Healthy    System
 
DISKPART>exit (This will exit diskpart and you can close out Command)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#12
dmccoy

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One thing to keep in mind is that you volume # that you select may be different. You want to select the one that has your letter G: If you do not know which to select then provide a screen after enter the following command.
 
DISKPART> list volume
 
  Volume ###  Ltr  Label        Fs     Type        Size     Status     Info
  ----------  ---  -----------  -----  ----------  -------  ---------  --------
  Volume 0                      NTFS   Partition    499 MB  Healthy
  Volume 1     C                NTFS   Partition    237 GB  Healthy    Boot
  Volume 2     G                FAT32  Partition     99 MB  Healthy    System

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#13
batpark

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mccoy:Thanks much for those detailed printouts. I get the prompt C:\windows\system32> but when I type DISKPART, I do not get what you do;

I don't get a Diskpart> prompt symbol; and I can't type in Diskpart>list volume or any of the other commands.

 

I suspect the trouble is I do not have the ADMINISTRATOR'S version of Command Prompt.

 

Earlier you told me to get that by clicking the search bar in the Start menu and searching for Command; then right clicking Command Prompt and selecting the Administrator's version.

 

I was not able to do that, however, as I could not find a search bar on the Start screen. Could you tell me where it is there? Some of the things I have read suggests that it may NOT be there at all in some versions of W10. If that applies to me, how can I get it? You may have already referred me to some videos but while those videos say it is "easy, I was not able to follow them. Would you please outline the steps?

 

Thanks, as ever. batpark


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#14
batpark

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mccoy: Eureka, I think I now have the Administrator's Command Prompt.

 

With reference to your #12 message in this thread, I am attaching a screenshot of the result of DISKPART> list volume.

 

Appears that my G disk is Volume3. Would you please confirm that .....    before I issue the command DISKPART> remove letter = G ?

 

...batpark


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#15
batpark

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mccoy: HERE is that screenshot.

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