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Powerline tweaking?

SplitEthernetSignal Signaldegrade

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#1
Cocavan

Cocavan

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I recently bought a pair of TP-Link AV2000 2-port Gigabit Passthrough Powerlines.  I haven't hooked them up yet (I'm still moving into my new home!)

 

My system will be as follows (as I understand it):  My cable modem will feed to my router.  One of my router ports will feed to my computer and one of my ports will feed to one of the TP devices that I'll plug into a convenient wall socket.  That will make my home's electric wiring system an Ethernet network.  I'll then plug the 2nd TP device into a wall socket in my den so that I can have an ethernet feed to my TV and to my Roku.

 

If there's anything wrong with my above understanding of what's what, please let me know.

 

In addition, I thought that I needn't stop there.  It seems to me that I could buy a hub or a switch (I don't know which would be better) to split my Ethernet signal before feeding it to one of my devices (the TP device has two output ports).  By doing that, I could link both of my laptops to the Ethernet signal via the hub/switch and get off the WiFi grid altogether.

 

My first question is:  is the above possible and, if so, what are the downsides, if any?  A degradation of signal, etc.?  And, if it's possible, which is better to use, a hub or a switch?

 

I'm new at all this and my imagination is often off the scale, so I need some cold reality thrown into my face.  Thanks.

 


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#2
paws

paws

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Hi Cocavan and welcome to our forums'

:welcome:

 

I have provided some basic information in blue below. To try and keep the reply as succinct as possible I have only given the most simplistic of answers that may necessarily lack some precision, and detail!

I recently bought a pair of TP-Link AV2000 2-port Gigabit Passthrough Powerlines.  I haven't hooked them up yet (I'm still moving into my new home!)

 

My system will be as follows (as I understand it):  My cable modem will feed to my router.  One of my router ports will feed to my computer and one of my ports will feed to one of the TP devices that I'll plug into a convenient wall socket.  That will make my home's electric wiring system an Ethernet network.  I'll then plug the 2nd TP device into a wall socket in my den so that I can have an ethernet feed to my TV and to my Roku.

 

If there's anything wrong with my above understanding of what's what, please let me know. No that is a fair summary of the situation

 

In addition, I thought that I needn't stop there.  It seems to me that I could buy a hub or a switch (I don't know which would be better) to split my Ethernet signal before feeding it to one of my devices (the TP device has two output ports).  By doing that, I could link both of my laptops to the Ethernet signal via the hub/switch and get off the WiFi grid altogether.

 

My first question is:  is the above possible Yes,

 

 and, if so, what are the downsides, if any?  A degradation of signal, etc.?  And, if it's possible, which is better to use, a hub or a switch? You don't really need either a switch or a hub if all you require is to connect devices (laptops for example) to each of the Ethernet ports on your TP link in your den. If you want multiple outlets available in your den  then you will need either a switch or a hub, Personally I would go for a 4 port switch, but for further information take a look here that describes the differences>

 

https://www.webopedi..._switch_hub.asp

 

I'm new at all this and my imagination is often off the scale, so I need some cold reality thrown into my face.  Thanks.

You are welcome, it looks like you have a good handle on this already... two further thoughts for you:

 

1 Try to plug in your TPlink in your den directly into the wall socket ( mains electricity outlet) and do not use a trailing 4 gang extension wire if such things are available in your locality.

 

2 Both TP links must be connected to the house electric services that are controlled by the same Meter. If for example your den is in an outbuilding that has a separate meter controlling the electricity supply then the presence of this second meter is sufficient to disable the TP links from working as your require.

 

 

Post back if you need any amplification

Regards

paws


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