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Linux for noobs


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#1
RedSuedePump

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Hi all,

 

For a long time, I've wanted to move away from Windows and so I've been reading this forum trying to figure out the best way to switch to Linux.

 

I currently use my computer for:

 

  • MS Office (Excel, Word, Outlook)
  • Surfing the internet, which includes playing games in Firefox
  • Skype
  • Emails
  • Online gaming (Origin)

It looks like I could do most or all of this via Linux, so I want to try to make the transition. Mint looks like the version that I'd like to try.

 

Having had a skim around this forum, I can't seem to pick up on a noob's guide to making the transition. I understand a 'parallel run' option with Windows or booting Linux from a stick are popular options to get you into Linux, but I can't seem to pick up on a tutorial to do this.

 

I'm pretty sure I'm not the first to ask to ask for this, could someone point me in the right direction please?

 

TIA

 

RSP


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#2
Gary R

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The best way to "try out" Linux, is to run the distro of your choice from a "bootable" USB drive, that way you don't have to make any material changes to your computer.

To create a bootable USB drive you will need .....Procedure is as follows ....
  • Download ISO file to your computer.
  • Download installer to your computer.
  • Insert USB drive you wish to "install" Mint to.
  • Launch the installer ....
    • Agree to the terms and conditions
    • Select Linux Distribution from the dropdown list
    • Browse to the ISO file you've downloaded and select it.
    • Select the appropriate drive letter for your USB drive (be careful to get this right, as this is where the installer will put Linux)
    • Click Create and wait for the process to complete.(Be patient, this can take a while)
Now shut down your computer, and when you boot up, you'll need to select the option to boot from your USB drive rather than your hard drive.

To do that, see ... https://lifehacker.c...drive-on-any-pc

If you let me know what computer you're using (make and model), I'll see if I can fnd specific details for how to access the boot option menu on your machine.
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#3
RedSuedePump

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Hi Gary,

 

Thanks, that's helpful. I think the computer is a box that was put together by the local computer shop, so I'm not certain I can find a make and model.

 

If I was to publish a Speccy report, would that help you with the specification?

 

Regards

 

RSP


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#4
Gary R

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It might.

 

If you post me the Speccy report we'll see if it gives me any clues.


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#5
RedSuedePump

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Hi,

 

Here's the speccy report:

 

http://speccy.pirifo...Ua1VVuVXBlQt0WX

 

Regards

 

RSP


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#6
Gary R

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OK, you have an MSI motherboard, so to access your BIOS, you'd need to hold down your Delete key when you power up. If all else fails, we can make a "permanent" (it's not really permanent because we can change things back) change to the boot order of you computer, so that it prioritises your USB drive over your hard drive (you will still be able to boot from your hard drive, but if a bootable USB is inserted in your machine, it will prioritise booting from that)

However there's very probably a function key that if you hold it down on power up, will bring up a "temporary" boot options menu, and that's usually the preferred method for booting from USB. (since we don't need to make any "permanent" changes to your machine if we use this method)

Commonly used function keys are F10, F9, F2 ........ but really any of the keys from F1-F12 can sometimes be used. Usually the combo required will show at the bottom of your screen when you power up.
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