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HDD / SSD swap-out Question


Best Answer iammykyl , 08 December 2018 - 09:03 PM

Looking for other members to give this the once over for mistakes and/or other suggestions. Agree with Phillpower2, I found Macrium the simplest to use and has everything you need. Note.Y... Go to the full post »


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#1
jmcchau

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Background info: 

I recently purchased a new HP Omen Laptop to replace my aging Digital Storm laptop.  

The new computer comes with a 1TB HDD and Windows 10 Home OS, and a 16GB Intel Optane Memory Accelerator.

My old computer has a 512GB Samsung 840 Pro SSD, and contains Windows 10 Pro OS and the games I've been playing (approx. 50% full).

Both drives are in the 2.5" form factor (6Gb SATA III).

 

I want to swap out the HDD in the Omen for the SSD from the Digital Storm laptop. 

Can I do this without much fuss (plug-n-play style), or are there specific steps that must be taken in order to make this work right?

In the end, I want the SSD to work with the Optane Accelerator in the same way that the HDD would.  Can it be done?

 

Thanks for the help! :)


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#2
paws

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Hi and welcome to our forums,

:welcome:

 

1 Your "old" SSD should fit your new computer OK, however as you know you will need to re-install Windows (or another operating system) on it, once you have done this then it should be fairly simple to reinstall your games.

Note you would find all sorts of trouble if you just tried to run the Win 10 pro installation of Windows on your SSD in your new computer

 

2 You would need to check the licensing position on your Win 10, if its an OEM licence then, they are usually limited to the original computer...

 

3 A possible course of action that might help you is:

 

4 Back up your SSD to removable media and when you are happy that all is secured, reproducible and contains several copies of everything you might need, format it.

 

Note formatting removes all the files from your SSD hence the need for a sound and tested back up with multiple copies

 

5 Clone or take a system image(s) of your new laptop's  HDD, and then swap out the HDD for the recently formatted SSD

 

6 Re-image the SSD with the system image from 5, you can then reinstall all your games

 

7 Do make sure that you create an emergency boot disc capable of accessing your clone/system images and make sure it works. Ensure that the emergency boot disc contains all the repair utilities you may need (sometimes cloning or imaging back to a SSD results in a non booting computer hence the need for the repair tools.)

 

8 If you use something like Macrium Reflect ( the free version will be just fine) for your cloning/system images then there is a handy wizard included in the software that will help you create the repair/emergency disc.

 

If you were thinking of just swapping out the HHD for the SSD and expecting it all to work Ok, its very unlikely to happen! :no:

 

Sorry can't help on the memory accelerator side of things as I have no experience with them.

Post back if you need further info.

Regards

paws


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#3
jmcchau

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Thank you Paws for that enlightening breakdown of the process.

 

I hadn't taken into consideration the Microsoft EULA when considering this swap.

 

If I've understood you correctly, you are saying:

 

1.  I can't actually use my current Win 10 Pro OS on any device other than the original Digital Storm laptop it was loaded on without violating the terms of the ULA, thus:

 

2.  I am required to purchase a new Win10 Pro licence if I want to run that OS on my new computer.

 

That really bites!  And it changes the situation significantly.

 

OK, that being the case, I'm thinking now that I'm just going to have to accept Win10 Home as my OS for the time being.  And that being the case, I'm thinking now that maybe I should just transfer my personal files to the HDD, reformat the SSD, and then connect it to the new computer via an external drive case/cable (Thunderbolt 3), then reinstall my games on the SSD.  Would that work out OK?  Can you envision any I/O bandwidth problems occurring with my games under such a configuration?


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#4
paws

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Hi,

On points 1 and 2 above you could be right. It would be wise to read the licence agreement carefully, before making any decisions.

 

If this was my machine I would be inclined to put the operating system and essential Programmes on the SSD connected to your computer internally via SATA and use the HDD via a caddy into a fast USB port for data etc.,

 

This would result in a considerable increase in speed across the board, however I'm not a gamer so don't know if the SSD will be sufficiently large to run your favourite game, if it is sufficient then that's the way I would go.

Regards

paws


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#5
jmcchau

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Cool Thanks, Paws.

 

I just finished chatting with HP, and they confirmed for me that the Omen 17t comes with a second internal HDD storage bay.  Not 100% sure if I trust them on that since they weren't the most technically oriented of employees, and the Specs page does not mention it at all.  But if true, then I wont need the extra cable connector to move things around.

 

But let's play Devil's Advocate for a minute and presume that it does not have a second HDD bay.  I was also thinking about trying to use the DVD slot to host a drive caddy for my SSD.  Would you know if that way of connecting an HDD/SSD to a computer provides the same I/O performance as the HDD bay (i.e. 6Gb SATA-III)?

 

V/R,

-J


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#6
iammykyl

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Gday.

If you intend trying to use the Optane, a heads up before altering hardware.

 

Optane.

Is designed to couple with a large HDD for best results.   Coupled with a SSD, in the real world, no significant improvement.

Desktop. is only supported on 7th/8th generation i3 (and up) CPUs.

Mobile, 8th Generation Intel® Core™ mobile    > https://www.intel.co...ane-memory.html

I think, the Omen Laptop is only 5th Generation?   Check. 


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#7
jmcchau

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Wow.  Good to know.  Thanks, iammykyl.

 

First off, the current Omen series uses the latest 7th & 8th Gen Intel processors.  HP is very clear about that, and would be criminally liable if they tried to sell the Optane-coupling option on rigs that couldn't benefit from it (wouldn't they?)

 

Could you define, "best results", a little more specifically please?  I get that an HDD + Optane solution will significantly improve performance over an HDD alone, and that an SSD + Optane solution won't improve the SSD performance much (if at all), but what about when all three are present?  1xSATA-III HDD, + 1xSATA-III SSD, + Optane?  If all I do is add the SSD in a second storage bay (or DVD drive caddy), and leave the other hardware items where they are, I can migrate my OS and best games/apps to the SSD and still get better performance out of the HDD + Optane combo for everything else, couldn't I?


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#8
iammykyl

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"Could you define, "best results", a little more specifically please? "

There are lots of conflicting opinions out there, so you will need to research where the results are a test, ie. > https://ssd.userbenchmark.com/Compare/WD-Black-NVMe-PCIe-M2-256GB-2017-vs-Intel-Optane--NVMe-PCIe-128GB/m237667vsm278104 showing inprovement using Optane + SSD.

 

"but what about when all three are present? "

http://www.legitreviews.com/intel-optane-memory-tested-with-secondary-hard-drive_205254 

>  https://hothardware....leration-review

 

As I don't have the hardware, you will need to find out how to enable optane on the secondary HDD.


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#9
jmcchau

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Copy that.  Thanks, iam!


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#10
iammykyl

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How did you manage with the swap, get it going OK?


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#11
jmcchau

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Hi,

 

I haven't gotten the computer I ordered yet.  When it arrives, I intend to take the SSD out of my old laptop and install it in the new laptop's second drive bay (I contacted HP and they confirmed for me that the Omen 17t has a second drive bay.)  I will then transfer over the files I want to keep before cloning the HDD onto it, then reset the boot order in the BIOS.  Sound good?  I'm also thinking that for now, I won't remove the original Windows install on the HDD in case I ever need to switch back to it for some reason in the future.

 

I do have a quick question for you guys relating to the cloning procedure:

 

I have been watching others do it on YouTube, and it appears that there are three major software programs for doing this:  Partition Wizard 10, Macrium Reflect, and Acronis True Image.  Which one would you choose and why?

 

Cheers!


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#12
phillpower2

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Three good programs but for me Macrium Reflect (free) see tutorial here provided courtesy of Essexboy.


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#13
iammykyl

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✓  Best Answer

Looking for other members to give this the once over for mistakes and/or other suggestions.

 

Agree with Phillpower2, I found Macrium the simplest to use and has everything you need.

 

Note.

You will need to install programs to the new laptop, complications can arise if you try to transfer programs from one computer to another one.

Only backup any Data you want from the SSD to a USB stick.

when you install the SSD to the new laptop, you would have two drives with the letter C:, so might be a Boot Manager error on startup.  Solution below.

You will need 5 USB sticks, sizes to suit use.

This is how I would do it.   Pretty long winded so print the instructions as once started you may not have internet access, and tick them off as performed.

 

Take anti static measures when working on the computers.

 

On the old laptop.

 

1.   Start Samsung Magician and first click on the ! at top right, update the software if available.   Then update the Firmware if a newer version is available. 

 

2.   Install Macrium.

 

3.   Create emergency media, include repair tools. (USB 1)   Test that it works.  

 

4.  Create an image of the SSD boot drive,  (USB 2)   Test.    Label it as it could be used should you want to put the drive back in again.   Remember that part of the image will include references/paths to the storage drive, so do not remove that drive.

 

5.   Backup all your Date, no programs, (USB 3)   Lebel and Test.

 

6.   Remove the SSD.

 

On the new laptop

 

1.   Install Macrium.

 

2.   Image the drive (USB 4) lebel and test.   You can use this to restore the laptop if everything goes pear shape.

 

3.   Update Windows, Drivers and any Utilities.   Configure your Browser.

 

4.   Install the latest version of Samsung Magician (click the ! to check as a new version may be available) ainstall programs you require, BUT, not your games programs.   I would leave them until you have the SSD installed.

 

5.   Test the Macrium rescue media to insure you have access to the new laptop.

 

6.   Install your Data from the USB 3 and inspect to make sure everything is present.

 

7.   Create an image of the new laptop Boot drive,(USB 5) lebel and test.

 

I would now use/test the new laptop for a couple of days to make sure everything is working to your satisfaction.   Then.

 

8.    Install the SSD.

 

9.    Boot and hold down the appropriate F key to bring up the boot manager, select the HDD and press enter.   If that does not work, Shut down, remove the power plug from the SSD, restart and should boot from the HDD.   Without turning off the computer, plug the power back into the SSD and bring up Disk management to see if detected.   If OK.

 

10.   Start Magician and secure eras the SSD.

 

11.   Open Disk Management.   Select the HDD, Change the drive letter to X:    Select the SSD,  insure it is set GPT, initalize and select drive letter C.

 

12.   Restart the laptop, enter the BIOs, set the SSD as first boot, save settings and exit.

 

If OK, use again for a couple of days to make sure it's alright then you can format the HDD and install your games to the SSD and configure how it interacts with the HDD,  


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#14
jmcchau

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Wow, thanks!  Really appreciate the step-by-step guide!

 

Aloha.


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