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PC randomly restarts/powers off and mouse freezes.


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#1
trips487

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Hello, I am not sure where to post this so I apologize if this is the wrong section. I had recently been receiving problems with my pc as it's been restarting or shutting down once I log into windows or open a browser. At first I thought it might be a maleware issue but after doing virus scans and male ware scans it came out nothing. I have also perform a clean reset on my pc through windows 10 with keeping personal files, but that did not seem to help. Is this a hardware issue? Maybe my pc is over heating or something else is wrong? It's about a 3-4 year old pc and I had built it myself. Hopefully I am able to receive some help here otherwise I might just take it to a tech if problems don't get fixed here. Thanks. 

 

Update: Mouse has stopped freezing but pc still does shut down or restart occasionally. 


Edited by trips487, 03 December 2018 - 11:00 PM.

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#2
phillpower2

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Hello trips487,

 

Moved to hardware as this appears to be unrelated to Windows 10.

 

If the computer is a desktop can you post the brand and model name or number of the power supply (PSU).

 

Download then run Speccy (free) and post the resultant url for us, details here, this will provide us with information about your computer hardware + any software that you have installed that may explain the present issue/s. 

 

To publish a Speccy profile to the Web:

  1. In Speccy, click File, and then click Publish Snapshot.
  2. In the Publish Snapshot dialog box, click Yes to enable Speccy to proceed.
  3. Speccy publishes the profile and displays a second Publish Snapshot. You can open the URL in your default browser, copy it to the clipboard, or close the dialog box.

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#3
trips487

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Sorry for the wait. Here is the information you needed. Thanks.

 

------

http://speccy.pirifo...SeoyElGEahsxaKZ


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#4
phillpower2

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No worries, we understand that you may have other things to take care of  :thumbsup:

 

High temps, voltages and memory use reported in Speccy so further investigation needed there first;

 

If the computer is a desktop can you post the brand and model name or number of the power supply (PSU).

 

 

You missed answering the above question, a flaky PSU will produce the symptoms that you describe and caused by the high voltages that we are seeing in Speccy.

 

If you are overclocking you should stop and restore the MBs default settings in the BIOS, the thermal shutdown point for your CPU is 61.1°C but it is reported as 71 °C by Speccy, this means one of two things, Speccy has it wrong or the thermal shutdown limit has been changed in the BIOS, the latter commonly done by folk who overclock.

 

Download [url="http://www.filehippo...load_speedfan/"]Speedfan[/url] and install it.  Once it's installed, run the program and post here the information it shows.  The information I want you to post is the stuff that is circled in the example picture I have attached.

If you are running on a vista machine, please go to where you installed the program and run the program as administrator.

 

speedfan.png

(this is a screenshot from a vista machine)

 

So that we have a comparison to Speedfan, download, run and grab a screenshot of HWMonitor (free).

 

To capture and post a screenshot;

 

Click on the ALT key + PRT SCR key..its on the top row..right hand side..now click on start...all programs...accessories...paint....left click in the white area ...press CTRL + V...click on file...click on save...save it to your desktop...name it something related to the screen your capturing... BE SURE TO SAVE IT AS A .JPG ...otherwise it may be to big to upload... Click on the More Reply Options tab then after typing in any response you have... click on Choose File...desktop...find the screenshot..select it and click on Attach This File...on the lower left...after it says upload successful...click on add reply like you normally would.

 

Screenshot instructions are provided to assist those that may read this topic but are not yet aware of the “how to”.


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#5
trips487

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Here are the results. I wasn't sure how much of the hwmonitor you wanted so I just posted a screen shot of the first part of it. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • hwmonitor results.jpg
  • speedfanresults.jpg

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#6
phillpower2

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Still waiting on the PSU information, for us to be best able to help you we need you to also help us by answering the questions that we ask.


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#7
trips487

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Still waiting on the PSU information, for us to be best able to help you we need you to also help us by answering the questions that we ask.

 

My apologies. I was trying to locate the information and wasn't able to find it. I have found the information now. The psu that I bought when I built the pc a few years ago is a

CORSAIR CX-M series CX600M 600W 80 PLUS BRONZE Active PFC ATX12V & EPS12V Modular Power Supply

https://www.newegg.c...N82E16817139048


Edited by trips487, 12 December 2018 - 07:11 PM.

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#8
phillpower2

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Not one of Corsairs best PSUs and the high failure rate that the early CX range of PSU had is proof of this, the CX range btw is only recommended for entry level computers by Corsair.

 

Your screenshots show high temps and voltages on the +5 and +12V rails on the PSU, the high voltages would explain the high temps which inevitably lead to the random shutdowns.

 

Restart the computer to enter the BIOS, check the temps and the +3.3, +5 and +12 voltages, make a note of them and post with the next reply for us.

 

 

NB: BIOS voltage readings.

 

The readings are not conclusive in the BIOS as the computer is under the least amount of load, if they are higher or lower than what they should be though it does suggest a PSU problem.


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#9
trips487

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 The current tempature that was listed is 71 degrees CPU  and 35 degrees system. However, I am not exactly sure where to find those +3.3,+5, and +12 Voltages. However, the numbers I did see that had a V next to them are 

 

CPU voltage: 1.224v

CPU-NB voltage 1.224v

DRAM voltage 1.504v

 

I located this in the overclocking section in the bios.  If there is another place I need to locate at can you please let me know thanks. Also just to let you know that the fans are really loud every time the pc is on and hot air does blow out of the system. So it seems like it's definitely a heating issue.


Edited by trips487, Yesterday, 12:33 AM.

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#10
AlexanderRoz

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I hope Phill won't mind me jumping in on his thread here.

Your CPU is boosting itself, which could be one of two things given the information I see. You have an overclock set to your boost frequency, minus one core. Or, Windows has been set to "High Performance" and Windows is keeping your CPU boosted to its max. As for your fans being loud, they're spinning at 100% (CPU) and 60% (case) maximum speed. I'll take an educated guess and say that when your computer crashes, you're opening some form of intensive program (video game(s), editing software, or yes, maybe a web browser streaming something).

If you have Windows set to High Performance, try reducing it to "Normal" or "Balanced". Here are some instructions from Dell (Windows 10). This should allow Windows to stop boosting your CPU. If it's already set to Balanced, then make sure your OC Settings in your BIOS are turned off, and that control is set to "AUTO". (As Phill has pointed out)

Adjust CPU Ratio: [Auto]

Adjust CPU-NB Ratio: [Auto]

CPU Smart Protection: Enabled
CPU Core Control: [Auto]

AMD Turbo Core Technology: [Auto]

DRAM Frequency: [Auto]

You can potentially help solve heat problems by spraying out any dust in your CPU Heatsink. This isn't a permanent fix. I would grab a can of compressed air from a nearby store (Micro Center, Best Buy, Fry's). When you blow the air in, make sure that your fans do NOT spin. If they're spinning, they can cause voltage to go into your board and fry it. Just use a hand and keep it still. Make sure you take anti-static precautions before attempting that (don't work on carpet. Grab a metal piece of your case before reaching in.)

IBM Resource for handling static-sensitive devices.

I hope this is somewhat helpful. 

Sincerely,
Alex

 


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