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Computer Crashing every 25-30 minutes

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#1
renocide

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i have been having an issue with my computer for some time I usually manage to get it working the only thing I know that seems to be connected to it working is Intel® Management Engine Interface whenever my device manager shows Intel MEI I know my computer is working however when it does show up it has a yellow explanation mark next to it I cant remember if it says code 10 or 45 though I think it shows 45. After a while though from trying to avoid turning off or restarting my computer I have to but when I do the Intel® Management Engine Interface disappears from device manager it will show up if I make it show hidden devices, however that's when the cycle of my computer completely crashing/switching off every 25-30 minutes begins the only way I have ever managed to fix it is to uninstall Intel MEI then completely unplug everything on my computer leaving it for a few hours it doesn't always work though hence why i'm finally writing about it I have tried everything to fix I even tried to manually install intel MEI but it wont install.  I thought it was hardware to begin with it could still be im not sure but it just seems strange that when intel MEI isn't showing up my computer starts acting up but when it's there it works perfectly fine.


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#2
KiwiProbie

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Hey renocide,

 

Let's check to see if there are any problems with the OS.  Please open start, type command prompt > Open as ADMINISTATOR.

 

When you have opened it, type in:

sfc /scannow

 

press enter and let it do the scan, please let me know how it goes for you.


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#3
renocide

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i have tried to do a scan but the issue is the computer crashing before it can finish 


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#4
KiwiProbie

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Ok what have you installed before this instarted happening?

Also what is your specs? What security software do you have?

Have you rebooted into safe mode (with network access) and tried doing it like that?


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#5
Nemesis-Dinu

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Since how long are you facing the issue, i would suggest boot to safemode with networking and do a system restore. and see if you are still facing the issue.

 

Prior to that i will suggest, go ahead and keep your system in bios for an hour or so. Just to rule out that its not an hardware issue.


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#6
britechguy

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I realize that this question is now 10 days old, but Intel has been churning out new Windows 10 drivers for virtually every component they make for over a year.  I've had the driver for my WiFi/Bluetooth combo card change many times during that time.  They are also not pushing these out to computer OEMs or Microsoft, either, or at least not in anything approaching a timely manner.

 

I would suggest downloading and installing the Intel Driver & Support assistant on any Windows 10 machine known to have Intel components.

 

If that isn't the issue then, next comes:  Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10

 

And if that doesn't work, next comes using one of the following three instruction sets (take your pick) to do a repair install (or actual upgrade if you don't have 1903 and also don't have the ISO for your currently installed version of Windows):

 

Non-Destructive Repair of Windows 10 - Answers to commonly asked questions

 

Doing an In-place "Upgrade" to Reinstall Windows 10 Keeping Apps/Programs and User Files

 

How to: Perform a Repair Upgrade Using the Windows 10 ISO file

 

Then, and only then, "the thermonuclear option," Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10


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#7
KiwiProbie

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Did you not read it what the OP said?  When he tries sfc /scannow his computer crashes before it finishes, so there for doing an DISM scan and repair will end up doing the same thing too.


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#8
britechguy

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Those who care to read know that I offered an entire sequence of steps that included updating drivers first, as this could be at the root of a number of issues.

 

Also, since DISM and SFC are entirely different tools, there is no guarantee that one may not be able to run DISM rather than SFC.

 

All of the above being said, my first choice in a situation like this is the repair install (or actual upgrade install if using a later ISO). 

 

But on any machine with Intel components, whether before or after the repair install (and I'd go for "before"), I would install and run the:  

Intel® Driver & Support Assistant  
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#9
KiwiProbie

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All of the above being said, my first choice in a situation like this is the repair install (or actual upgrade install if using a later ISO).

 

That would have been my next suggestion is to do a repair, but I have been waiting on this OP to reply.


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#10
britechguy

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At this juncture, I have grave doubts as to whether the OP is still around or reading.

 

There are times, and this was one of them, that I was making my reply as much for future searchers with a similar situation going on as for the OP.

 

And we both seem to be in agreement that the "new" (as in with Windows 10) option of the install-over repair install is both easy, non-destructive, and can correct a multitude of sins in one fell swoop while allowing the end user to keep all their personal files and installed apps.   I only wish this option had existed many years ago, and was as easy and painless - as well as quick - to perform.  But we have it now.

 

I personally always use the "download the ISO" method, as I've had the MCT barf between having finished doing that but before the bootable media is successfully created when using the MCT to create the USB media, and then the ISO is lost (as is the time you spent downloading it).   Also, for a repair install, I no longer even bother with creating bootable media.  You can simply right click on the ISO, choose Mount from the context menu, and Windows will open a File Explorer window with the ISO mounted as a virtual DVD drive.  Then you kick off setup.exe from that File Explorer window and away you go!


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