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How To Enable Volume Equalization?

Volume Equalization

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#1
Russell1811

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Hi Friends,
 
How can I use volume equalization? Does it help in realty to soothe the sound? What do you guys do for the purpose?

Edited by iMacg3, 01 August 2019 - 09:05 AM.
Topic moved from How-To Guides to Digital Video and Audio

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#2
britechguy

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Your question is a bit overly broad.

 

Enabling sound equalization (and by this I presume you mean level equalization) in what context?    Playing MP3 files, for instance.

 

If my "for instance" is actually what you're trying to get consistent perceptual volume levels on, so you don't go from quiet to blasting loud as songs are shuffled, then post-process the MP3 files you have with MP3Gain.   After I rip CDs the first thing I do before moving the result to my actual music library is to run MP3Gain (Track Gain option) on the resulting MP3 files.


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#3
Russell1811

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Thanks a lot for the clarification. Would it it best to use this Windows inbuilt method to achieve the result or should I use a 3rd party app?


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#4
britechguy

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There is no "right" answer here without knowing where and when you intend to play and listen to the same media.

 

If you plan on listening to MP3 media across players in different settings, then using MP3Gain is your best bet.    If you intend only to listen via your computer, then on the fly loudness equalization is fine, too, but does take processing power every time something is played (not much, but still).

 

It's really a question that can only be answered based on your actual intended listening scenario(s).


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