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Boot Device Not Found - HP Laptop

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#16
FreeBooter

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Reboot system to find out if Windows 10 boots if not follow below instructions.

You will have to use Diskpart command to find out the System Reserved partition drive letter.
The output of the below commands may display the name of the System Reserved partition as only System or ESP.

Type diskpart and press Enter.
Type list volume and press Enter.
Under the label row, find the label System Reserved and note its corresponding Volume number.
Now type select Volume=N and press Enter, where N is the Volume number you noted earlier.
Now type assign letter=w and press Enter.
Type exit and press Enter.
Type bcdboot C:\Windows /s w: /f ALL and press Enter.


Please replace partition letter C: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.

Execute bootrec /fixboot command and restart your computer.


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#17
GhostLoad

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Reboot system to find out if Windows 10 boots if not follow below instructions.
 

Yeah now I'm getting a black "No bootable device -- insert boot disk and press any key" black screen. I tried setting my BIOS back to default and restart again, but got the same original "Boot device not found" black error screen.

EDIT: I've gotta go to class, I'll be back in about 2 hours. Luckily it's math, so I don't need my laptop for it lol.


Edited by GhostLoad, 26 September 2019 - 03:18 PM.

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#18
FreeBooter

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If you haven't make sure to enable UEFI firmware to check Windows 10 boots if it does not then boot into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) and execute Diskpart commands.


Edited by FreeBooter, 26 September 2019 - 03:18 PM.

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#19
GhostLoad

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If you haven't make sure to enable UEFI firmware to check Windows 10 boots if it does not then boot into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) and execute Diskpart commands.

 

How do I know which volume is the system reserve? None are labeled as such.


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#20
FreeBooter

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Partition filesystem is fat32 post a picture of the Diskpart command.


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#21
GhostLoad

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Partition filesystem is fat32 post a picture of the Diskpart command.

So, Volume 5 then?

E9FbgEC.jpg


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#22
FreeBooter

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Yes its Volume 5.


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#23
GhostLoad

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Reboot system to find out if Windows 10 boots if not follow below instructions.

You will have to use Diskpart command to find out the System Reserved partition drive letter.
The output of the below commands may display the name of the System Reserved partition as only System or ESP.

Type diskpart and press Enter.
Type list volume and press Enter.
Under the label row, find the label System Reserved and note its corresponding Volume number.
Now type select Volume=N and press Enter, where N is the Volume number you noted earlier.
Now type assign letter=w and press Enter.
Type exit and press Enter.
Type bcdboot C:\Windows /s w: /f ALL and press Enter.


Please replace partition letter C: with Windows installed partition letter. When computer boots into Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.

Execute bootrec /fixboot command and restart your computer.

Input the commands for volume 5, but I get no readout when I do the "Bcdedit /enum" command. I only saw that part AFTER typing "bcdboot C:\Windows /s w: /f ALL" so I don't know if that's why? I shut down and tried again but used bcdboot D:\Windows etc etc but it said "Failure when attempting to copy boot files" so I did the C drive line again, and when I input the fixboot command it says "Access is denied"....?


Edited by GhostLoad, 28 September 2019 - 01:15 PM.

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#24
FreeBooter

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Did the "bcdboot C:\Windows /s w: /f ALL" completed with success?


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#25
GhostLoad

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Did the "bcdboot C:\Windows /s w: /f ALL" completed with success?

Yeah it said "boot files successfully created"


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#26
FreeBooter

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So what happens when you try to boot Windows 10?


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#27
GhostLoad

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So what happens when you try to boot Windows 10?

Well, I got the  "Failure when attempting to copy boot files" message when using "bcdboot C:\Windows /s w: /f ALL" and when I restarted nothing happened (still had the boot device not found message)


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#28
FreeBooter

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I think you should backup your personal files and clean install Windows 10.


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#29
GhostLoad

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I think you should backup your personal files and clean install Windows 10.

Alright I guess, I dunno how I would back up the files on that laptop right now but luckily it's only school work which I have already backed up in triplicate so I'll just do that clean install. Thanks for all of your helping


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#30
FreeBooter

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You can use a external storage drive to backup your personal files stored at the hard drive of the computer with non-booting Windows.

Here is how:

1. Connect the external storage drive to the computer with non-booting Windows.

2. Insert the Windows Installation DVD into your CD/DVD drive.

3. Configured the BIOS boot device order setting to start from a CD/DVD optical drive.

uY4awFa.png

4. If prompted, press any key to start the computer from the Windows Installation DVD.

5. Choose your language settings, and then click Next button.

6. Click Repair your computer.

ZICFHd8.png

7. To access WinRE environment from Windows Vista and Windows 7 select the Windows installation you want to repair, and then click Next button.

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After you click Next, the System Recovery Options menu appears.

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8. To access WinRE from Windows 8, 8.1 and Windows 10 click Troubleshoot.

bnA0IFb.png

After you have click the Troubleshoot the Troubleshoot screen appears.

VWLtwEw.png

9. Click Advanced options on the Troubleshoot screen to access more WinRE recovery utilitys in Advanced options screen.

Hn5gZ2W.png

10. Launch the Command Prompt.

11. Within the Command Prompt type Notepad.exe and press Enter key.

12. From opened Notepad click the Save option from the File pull down on the menu bar.

WPaZGlS.png

13. This action launches Windows Explorer, from the navigation pane, navigate to the directory where your personal files are stored.

rLR6X1J.png

14. Right click any file or folder you want to backup and click Copy from the context menu.

15. From the Windows Explorer navigation pane, click the external storage drive to open it and paste the file or folder you have copied to the external storage drive.

HWIHVTE.gif

That is it!
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