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Can a router be affected by metal in a floating shelf?


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#1
gasleak

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Planning on installing a floating shelf for my router.
Floating shelves have small metal tubes that go into the shelf itself which are it's bracket; usually at least halfway in and they tend to be around 2-3cm in diameter.
There is also usually a metal backplate.
This is an example:
https://mastershelf....helf-bracket-6/
 

Will my wi-fi signal suffer due to the floating shelf metal bracket? 


Edited by gasleak, 21 October 2019 - 08:16 AM.

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#2
zep516

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Hello gasleak,

I suppose it's possible. You may need to experiment with placement, location to see if there is any difference in signal strength.
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#3
gasleak

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Hello gasleak,

I suppose it's possible. You may need to experiment with placement, location to see if there is any difference in signal strength.

Router cannot be placed anywhere else


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#4
zep516

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Wireless Signal Interference

There are two basic types of wireless signal interference that could impair your router's performance. The first type comes from nearby devices that are operating in the same bandwidth as the router, such as cordless phones, baby monitors and other people's Wi-Fi networks. The second kind of interference is caused by physical barriers. Wireless signals are degraded as they attempt to pass through dense materials such as concrete, bulletproof glass and metal; signals fare better when passing through wood, regular glass and even brick.

Metal and Wireless Signals

Metal objects that come between your router and computer can obstruct signals. A wireless signal has no problem passing through a wooden desk but a metal desk can pose a real problem. Other common offenders include filing cabinets, metal shelving, pipes and walls. Areas of a home or office affected by metal obstructions are called “dead zones.” Minimizing these dead zones will help you use your router to its full potential.


See here.

https://smallbusines...ters-73559.html
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