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Plug power cord into wall socket ......


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#1
batpark

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In the instruction matter that comes with PC equipment, I often see the instruction to connect the power plug directly.to the wall outlet; do not use an intermdiary power strip, lightning protector, or extention cord.

 

I am curious. Just what technical problem are the manufacturers trying to avoid ?

 

Thanks. ...batpark

 


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#2
phillpower2

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Do you have a link to an example of this information batpark.

 

Fwiw, good practice is to have a back up power supply such as a UPS that will have surge protection as standard so not sure how having anything less can be deemed as safe.


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#3
batpark

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phillpower2:   This example is from advice I received from HP. See item 4. .... batpark

 

I recommend you follow the below steps and check if it helps.

  1. With the printer turned on, disconnect the power cord from the rear of the printer and also unplug the power cord from the wall outlet. 

  2. Remove USB cable, if present. 

  3. Wait for 2-3 minutes, press and hold the power button on your printer for about 30 seconds to remove any additional charge. 

  4. Now plug back the power cable straight to a wall outlet without any surge protector or an extension cord (This is important) and then plug back the power cord to the printer. 

  5. Turn on the printer and wait till warm-up period finishes and the printer is idle


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#4
123Runner

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Sounds to me since its a printer and doing troubleshooting that they are making sure that it is getting power and eliminating anything possibly wrong with an extension cord, power strip, etc.

It is a good troubleshooting step.


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#5
batpark

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123Runner: : FWIW ... I somehow concluded that HP's concern had something to do with static charges. Does that make any sense?


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#6
phillpower2

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Looks like we are all in agreement here, the HP info is standard practice as to "how to" remove residual charge from a component when troubleshooting, it does not mean that you should never have the device connected to a power strip/power strip with an incorporated surge protector etc.


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#7
Kemasa

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I don't know if that is for a laser printer, but a laser printing can take quite a bit of power when starting up. Not all power cords and power strips are rated at 15A, which is what a typical wall outlet is. Each additional connection can cause a drop in voltage since it isn't a perfect connection, which can cause problems. Each additional item can cause problems, so reducing it can be good, especially if there is a problem.


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