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Windows ME service pack version 1.05 installation and Windows ME syste

Windows ME

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#1
Colman Leung

Colman Leung

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Hello everybody,

 

I recently installed Windows ME virtual machine in Windows 10 Pro version 2004 as the host operating system. I am running Vmware Workstation Pro version 12.59. After installing Windows ME virtual machine, I downloaded Windows ME service pack version 1.05. Before installing service pack 1.05, I checked the installation instructions. The installation instructions told me to install Internet Explorer 6 service pack 1 and disable system file protection prior to installation of service pack version 1.05.

 

I would like to know why I must disable Windows ME system file protection? If I leave system file protection enabled will it disable the Windows ME service pack version 1.05 installation? How do I disable Windows ME system file protection? Also, is there any way we can update Windows ME system file protection so that it won't disable the installed Windows ME service pack version 1.05 and reinstall the original Windows ME files before service pack version 1.05 was installed?

 

 

Thank you very much for your help


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#2
paws

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I have no experience of using Win ME on a VM, however I can remember using Win ME natively, around 20 years or so ago as an operating system in its own right....

 

My memory on some of the details may be tad flakey, but maybe the following thoughts may help.

 

1 Win ME was the first Windows operating system to automatically include System Restore (System File Protection?)

 

2 Basically it had the ability ( usually!) to set back the computer in time to a similar state as existed just before the system Restore Point was created

 

3 It was a powerful tool and technicians urged folks to create a System Restore Point before making adjustments on their computers, so that if things went wrong the system could be set back in time, to how it was when the System Restore Point was created. It was especially useful when inexperienced folks tried tinkering with Registry!

 

4 For example if you installed a program and you had the foresight to create a System Restore Point immediately prior to the installation then it would have the ability to set back the computer in time and thus remove the installed Program and its component parts should things go wrong.

 

5 It was ( and still isn't) a totally 100% solution to all and every problem but it has sure got a lot of folks out of trouble over the years

 

6 If you create a System Restore Point prior to installing  Service Pack 1.05 and then choose to set back the computer in time using the System Restore Point then Yes it will have the effect of taking out the Service Pack.

 

7 The System Restore Points ( some folks refer to them as snapshots) take up hard drive space and I think originally approx 15% of the hard drive was allocated to them. If space on the hard drive became insufficient then some of the earlier ones were likely to be deleted.( although a useful tool it is no where as good as having good up to date disc images, but is often an effective adjunct to them.

 

8 If System Restore was turned off then it had the effect of deleting all the stored System Restore Points...

 

9 If a machine acquired a Virus or other items of undesirable code and was subsequently cleaned of the undesirable/malicious code then subsequent to that a System Restore point was activated then the machine would be set back in time to just before the System Restore Point was created and this could mean that the virus or other malicious code would be put back as well!

 

10 In recent times the System Restore Utility has been disabled by default upon for example installation of the operating system... and to take advantage of its facilities it has been necessary to switch it on. ( Turning it on is what I recommend for a lot of ordinary folks)

 

I hope these thoughts provide an insight into how it works but post back if you require further information

Regards

paws


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#3
Colman Leung

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Hello Paws,

 

I found an article on Windows Me PC Heatlh feature on the ITProtoday website. The system file protection is different from system restore. According to this article, Windows ME has a PC Health system which is made up of three components: system file protection, system restore, and auto update.

 

Here is the link: https://www.itprotod...atures-examined

 

 

My question is after reading this article, do I really need to disable the system file protection (SFP) if I install the service pack which has the most up to date files. Should I just leave the entire PC Health feature alone before I install the service pack? The installation instructions told me to install Internet Explorer service pack 1 and disable SFP. Assuming the service pack files are the most recent files which are even more than the core system files protected by system file protection.

 

According to the article, "SFP is deceptively simple: The SFP Monitor maintains a database of system files that it will monitor, while providing copies of each of these files in a hidden location on the disk. When one of these files is overwritten or deleted, the Monitor restores the original version of the file, unless the new version is a more recent version. If the new version of the file is more recent, then SFP stores a copy of that version in its hidden cache. The process is silent and occurs without user intervention.

 

 

In Windows Me, almost 900 files are protected by SFP; you can find the list of protected files in the Windows Me Restore directory (C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\RESTORE\FILELIST.XML by default). Note that these files are considered core system files: SFP will not protect data files, third party files, and the like."

 

 

Thank you for your help.

 

 

Colman


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#4
paws

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I think I would be inclined to follow the instructions to the letter, however with a VM if you make an error surely you can just reboot and start an alternative approach?

Regards

paws


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