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Ram Timing and latency


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#1
oldmantaggie

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I am looking to buy new ram, and want to know what the timing (three or four numbers) and latency (one decimal number) mean, thanx. Also, what is the difference between unbuffered and registered

Edited by oldmantaggie, 26 June 2005 - 08:33 PM.

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#2
ernieh

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i dont know what the timing and the regiestered thing means but the latency is how many clock cycles i takes for the RAM to responed to a request of information from the cpu most of the time it is 2.5. if your cpu has a front side bus of 1 GHz it would take 2.5 microseconeds for the ram to responed. the lower the latency the better
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#3
Rockster2U

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A specification of 2-3-2-6-1T, translates to:
2 - CAS (Column Address Strobe Latency) = CL (Cycle Length)
3 - TRCD (RAS to CAS delay)
2 - TRP (RAS Precharge)
6 - TRAS (Active to Precharge)
1T - Command Rate

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#4
spudZ

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Registered RAM - More expensive, only used on socket 940 motherboards because it can't use unbuffered. Not any better then unbuffered

Unbuffered RAM - Exact same thing as registered RAM, only less expensive and compatible with all motherboards exept socket 940 as mentioned above.
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#5
oldmantaggie

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Hey, thanks for your help you guys :tazz:
So with the timings, i want as low as possible for all numbers?

Also, what is the difference between timings that have 3 #'s and timings that have 4 #'s? What does it mean if the timing does not have T1 on it?

Edited by oldmantaggie, 28 June 2005 - 04:24 PM.

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#6
Pocketknifesown

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Voltage is also important when talking about timings it might run 2-2-2-5 but at 3.2 volts and youre mobo might only go up to 2.8 volts. Im not sure on this could someone clarify please?
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#7
Rockster2U

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Generally speaking yes, but this whole subject can become very confusing very quickly - brings out the best of "a little knowledge is dangerous".

I'd suggest you head over here and read to your heart's content.

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#8
Rockster2U

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Pocketknifesown:

Generally speaking, specific memory is set to run at a specific default voltage. Most manufacturers of DDR recommend 2.5, 2.6 or 2.7 volts. One can often extract some better than default memory bus speeds and may have to increase the voltage to get there while still maintaing stability. It goes without saying that any memory that is run must be compatable with the board and voltage would be one of many considerations.

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