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harddrive crashed


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#31
chwhitecat

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Is that where I push f8 when the Bios screen comes up? If so I haven't tried that and will try it . If I boot up in safe mode will I be able to transfer files if the old HD is recognized?

Edited by chwhitecat, 09 July 2005 - 09:18 PM.

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#32
peterm

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that is when you push F8 if you can see the disc then you can transfer.
ALSO
read this
• Master with non-ATA compatible slave: Use this setting if the slave
drive is not recognized. Configure the master drive with a jumper set on
pins 5 and 6 and pins 7 and 8 to enable this option.
• Cable select: Computers that use cable select to determine the master
and slave drives by selecting or
deselecting pin 28, CSEL, on
the interface bus. To enable
cable select, set a jumper on
pins 5 and 6.
• Alternate capacity jumper:
Drives with a 40-Gbyte capacity
or greater are limited to 32
Gbytes. Use this jumper only if
you have a legacy system with a
BIOS that does not support
large capacity disc drives. When
using the alternate capacity
jumper,
• Manager software is required to
achieve the drive’s full capacity.
Attaching cables and mounting the drive
1. Attach one end of the drive interface cable to the interface connector
on your computer’s motherboard (see your computer manual for connector
locations).
Caution. Align pin 1 on the motherboard connector with pin 1 on your
drive connector. Pin 1 is marked by a stripe on one side of the
cable.
2. Secure the drive using four 6-32 UNC mounting screws in either the
side-mounting or bottom-mounting holes. Insert the screws no more
than 0.20 inches (5.08 mm) into the bottom-mounting holes and no
more than 0.14 inches (3.55 mm) into the side-mounting holes.
Note. Do not overtighten the screws or use metric screws. This may damage
the drive.
3. Attach the interface connector and the power connector to the drive.
Configuring the BIOS
Close your computer case and restart your computer. your computer may
automatically detect your new drive. If your computer does not automatically
detect your new drive, follow the steps below.
a. Restart your computer. While the computer restarts, run the System
Setup program (sometimes called BIOS or CMOS setup). This is usually
done by pressing a special key, such as DELETE, ESC, or F1 during
the startup process.
b. Within the System Setup program, instruct the system to auto detect
your new drive.
c. Enable LBA and UDMA modes, if available and then save the settings
and exit the Setup program.
When your computer restarts, it should recognize your new drive. If your
system still doesn’t recognize your new drive, see the troubleshooting section
on the back of this sheet.
Options jumper block
2 6 8 4
1 7 5 3
Drive is slave
*Master or single drive
*Cable select
Master with non ATAcompatible
slave
Alternate capacity.
Limits drive capacity
to 32 Gbytes

Note. When configuring two ATA devices on
the same cable, both must use Cable
Select or both must use Master/Slave
jumper settings. If using a standard
40-pin cable, the master and slave
drives can be placed in any position. If
using a 40-pin 80-conductor cable, attach
the blue connector to the motherboard,
the black connector to the master drive
and the grey connector to the slave.

Edited by peterm, 10 July 2005 - 01:56 AM.

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#33
chwhitecat

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Tried booting in safe mode with drives connected as Primary and Secondary master but it wouldn't recognize bad drive this morning so am freezing it again and will try safe mode then - if that doesn't work am going to try master and slave one more time and try to boot in safe mode . If none of that works I think I will take it apart and try again. Did that with another drive and got lucky because it worked.
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#34
chwhitecat

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:tazz:
I guess I have tried everything short of paying tons of money and its not worth that. Computer recognized old drive in BIOS started new one in safe mode but on my computer it did not appear. Tried it as single master with nothing else hooked up and computer recognized it but could not start in safe mode. Didn't take it apart because I am sure that would not be succesful.
THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR HELP - I APPRECIATE YOUR TIME AND EFFORT
Carol ;)
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#35
peterm

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does it start at safe mode command prompt?
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#36
chwhitecat

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It does when I have both drives connected but when I go to my computer the second(bad drive)doesn't show even though it showd in the Bios. When I have only the bad drive connected it shows in the BIOS but won't start in safe mode or normally.

Edited by chwhitecat, 10 July 2005 - 02:09 PM.

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#37
peterm

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so with both drives connected you can get to the safe mode command prompt
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#38
chwhitecat

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Yes the Bios lists the Seagate as Primary Master and the WD as Secondary Master then when I pushed F8 it went into safe mode. I booted up in Safe Mode but when I went to My Computer it only showed the Seagate not the WD.

Edited by chwhitecat, 11 July 2005 - 05:15 AM.

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#39
peterm

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can you see it at the safe mode command prompt? type d: and press enter

Edited by peterm, 11 July 2005 - 04:55 PM.

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#40
chwhitecat

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I tried and instead of giving me command prompt it asked for the 2nd xp home edition disc. I don't have it I only have an upgrade disc. Also since GerryF said to connect it alone with no CD my disc drive was unplugged so I will have to move my good harddrive up in the computer so the ribbon will reach the CD drive and then try it again with the upgrade disc. I have to go out of town for the rest of the week so is it OK if I wait until then to try it again and then let you know what happened? Thanks Carol
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#41
peterm

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yep the time does not matter
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#42
chwhitecat

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Well I am back. I started with command prompt and when I typed in d: and hit enter it said - device not ready. this :tazz: hard drive simply does not want me to get into it. If you have any more suggestions I am game - if you think it is a dead end just let me know. Carol
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#43
wannabe1

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Hi chwhitecat...

At the command prompt, try typing D:dir and press Enter...Does this show a directory of the drive?

Again, at the command prompt, type D:chkdsk /r...note the space between chkdsk and /...and press Enter

Do either of these options work?

wannabe1
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#44
chwhitecat

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No matter what I type in it just says The device is not ready.
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#45
Carobu

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Just a segestion I know I'm not a high ranking staff or anything and I'm not even sure if it would work but maybe (don't do without confirming) windows is corrupted I had a similar problem recently on one of my older computers I fixed by doing this:
First I put the XP disk in.
Second I Entered setup mode well booting not the bios
Three I told it to boot from cd
Fourth make sure it's set to do so by going into the bios and checking to see if your cd is set to boot
Fifth boot and I can't quite remeber (ask a staff I guess) but a command promp should come up and type if I remeber chkdsk and a checker shoudl run to see if anyfiles from windows are missing
Sixth then type when that is done chkdsk /repair and that should run and find anyfiles from windows missing and replace them.

Like I said I'm not sure if you knew this already or have tried it or even applies to your problem keep working with the staff I guess hope I was of some help.
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