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Building my own computer... Are these parts OK?


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#1
kr580

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So far I have this picked out. Is it all compatible? I read all the specs a few times over and it looks good to me but I'm no expert. I could have easily made a mistake.

Case

Mobo

Proccessor

RAM

Video Card

Hard Drive

DVD/CD Drive

Win XP Home

USB PCI Card

And a few questions:

1. Is that Mobo good? I don't really know what too look for. I just picked one that seemed good.
2. Do I need to get a heatsink/fan for the P4 chip or is that all included?
3. Would I need any extra case fans? If yes, what kind?
4. Is that USB PCI good? I read the reviews and a couple people had trouble installing it.
5. Is there anything else you recommend me getting at all? Anything.
6. Lastly... Is there anything else I would need to buy that doesn't come with it all (wires, fans, adapters, etc... anything)
if I think of any more I'll post em.

Sorry for the questions. I've never done this before and want to be sure.


Thanks in advance - Kevin :tazz:
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#2
seanshaffer23

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seems like you're trying to save a lot of money. you picked a lot of cheap stuff. if i were you i'd look around newegg.com for a barebone kit and read the reviews. most people post what they put in their rig and if it works for them, maybe it'll work for you too.
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#3
kr580

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If I bought all this and it worked I would be happy with my computer. I don't ask much of it and don't expect a whole lot from it... just a normal computer. Now if someone send certain components are junk I would try to find another.

Reason for cheapness:
Case - Can you go wrong with any certain case? It will be sitting in one spot and hardly be touched so it doesn't need to be super sturdy or durable.
Mobo - I could understand a change due to the price... but is it a good one even tho it's cheap? I won't be surprised if this is a bad one. Lay it to me.
Proccessor - Pentium 4, 3.0GHz, 800MHz FSB... is this cheap?
RAM - Not much less then the top-of-the-line for 512MB
Video Card - Has features I want that others don't. 99% sure this is staying.
Harddrive - Same price as any other 160GB. Just has a $40 rebate. Is this bad somehow?
CD/DVD Drive - I won't use this much so I don't really care if it's the best or not. Not gonna shell out another $60 for something I'll hardly use.
Win XP Home - Yea...
USB PCI Card - Same as Mobo... Is this a bad card?

So I'm sticking with me making this... please comment accordingly. I'm not trying to sound mean... sorry if I come off that way. I tend to do that. :tazz:


Thanks - Kevin

Edited by kr580, 09 July 2005 - 09:07 PM.

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#4
seanshaffer23

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Actually, you can go wrong with a case. The material the case is made of may provide sturdiness but some metals disperse heat better than others. Also, you want the case to have lots of room for upgrades or modifications, and space for fans. Make sure your mobo fits in the case too. As for the processor, it is compatible with the mobo but here is a list of more P4s. They are also compatible but some are better than the one you chose. The RAM is a good choice, Kingston is top-of-the-line. Your case comes with 2 USB ports but considering you have the room for it on your mobo, that seems like a good plan. I should have been more clear earlier. The hard drive is a very good deal. Maxtor makes good HDDs and it sounds like you found yourself a deal. You should stick with the video card. One last thing: Your mobo doesn't come with integrated audio so you'll have to buy a card for it.

P.S. The processor comes with a fan. If you want more case fans (I would get at least 1 or 2) the case comes with one 80mm case fan and can support 3 more. Here is a link to more case fans.
One last thing you may want to consider: thermal paste for the CPU. It helps keep it cool. I can't think of any other suggestions. If anyone else has comments, plz do tell.

*I almost forgot: If you want to consider a different mobo, here is a list. These are compatible with your chosen processor but make sure you look at the compatibility for the other components as well.

Edited by seanshaffer23, 10 July 2005 - 10:18 AM.

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#5
kr580

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Thanks... this helps alot.

Couple more questions:
1. Do these fans seem good? Not sure what to look for on the fan specs.
2. Does the Mobo have a Ethernet port? I see "LAN: LAN Type - 10/100Mbps | Port Type - RJ-45 | LAN Chipset - VIA VT6103".
3. I thought it came with a sound card. "Audio: Channels - 5.1 Channels | Audio Chipset - AC '97 CODEC". Isn't that the card? Or does that mean what it's compatible with?

Thanks - Kevin
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#6
kr580

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And about the processor... That's all I need. On this computer i have a Pentium 4 1.6 GHz and it seems ok... 3.0 should be plenty good for me.
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#7
KGH

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I agree with Sean. Don't skimp on the case. Not only will a better case provide more efficient heat dissipation, but it will also have improved static qualities and provide more space for future upgrades (though see below). I would also be suspicious of the '450 watt' psu that the case you have chosen comes with.

Try and find out what amperage the 12v line puts out. You really should buy a separate PSU from Antec, Enermax, PC Power etc, or alternatively, buy a case, for example from Antec, with a good PSU pre-installed. Around 21A on the 12v line would be plenty for you.

Are you intending to use the system for work / games / mix? If it is primarily to be used as a gaming machine, you should consider an AMD processor and a socket 939 config.

Also, socket 478 is / has been replaced by socket 775 so you will be severely limited in future upgrades.

The cpu will come with a HSF if you are purchasing a retail cpu. If it is OEM, you will need to purchase the heatsink and fan separately which is probably not a bad idea for a prescott in any event.
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#8
kr580

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What are the dangers of having that PSU? Could I just upgrade later if I don't think it's working how I want?

I won't be gaming much at all, if any. I will mostly use it for Internet, Frontpage, Photoshop, Video recording/editing and just any other program you might use.


What about this?


Case (Same)

Mobo (New)... Is this compatible with the Processor below?

Proccessor (New)

RAM (Same)

Video Card (Same)

Hard Drive (Same)

DVD/CD Drive (Same)

Win XP Home (Same)

USB PCI Card (New)... old one had bunch of bad reviews on multiple sites.

Case Fan x3 (Added)
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#9
KGH

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I don't know anything about the motherboard, but it is compatible in the sense that it uses the same socket as the cpu. I'm not sure whether it supports the '530' though.

Can't say what the problems with that power supply could be without knowing what's on the 12v line. However, newer processors and systems require more juice to run stable and to maintain an uninterrupted and clean flow of power you need a good PSU. Cheap PSU's often manifest instability problems such as random restarts and shutdowns and inability to boot. It can also pose a danger to your system components if it runs too hot etc. You would also want to make sure it had a compatible 20 or 24 pin connector for your mobo. Not much good if it has a non detachable 24 pin connector and your mobo only supports a 20 pin.
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#10
kr580

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i found the case on another site that has all the specs

Site...

Power Supply Output:
+3.3V/26A
+5V/35A
+12V/15A
-5V/0.5A
-12V/0.8A
+5Vsb/2A


Edit: I went to the Mobo's site and found a list of compatible CPUs.

Site...

"P4-530/530J 3.0 GHz (1MB,800 MHz,LGA775) Yes" :tazz:

Edited by kr580, 10 July 2005 - 10:59 PM.

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#11
KGH

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What brand is the PSU?

I think most people on these forums would tell you that 15A is probably a little low on the 12v line for a '450 watt' PSU.

It will be worthwhile investing in a decent Antec true power unit. They are relatively inexpensive (especially when bought preinstalled in an antec case) and are a solid PSU.

I think you should look for at least 18A-21A on the 12v line.
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#12
kr580

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No idea on the brand... just says '450 watt power supply'.

Aah... my link doesn't work. Go to http://www.geeks.com/ > Cases > '10-Bay Matrix ATX Window Case w/450-Watt PS (Red)'

It's the only red case, you can't miss it.
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#13
KGH

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I can't seem to access the detailed specs for the case, but for $30 (presumably US$) you've got to be a little wary.

A good PSU is really important. If you read some threads in the 'Hardware, Component etc' troubleshooting section of this site (and on, for example, the AMD support website) you will see how many problems are caused by PSU's rated at 450w which effectively only put out 300w of bad power.

Of course, it could work flawlessly...but chances are, in the long run, you'll have problems with it.
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#14
kr580

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What kind of wattage do you recommend?


Edit: Case specs that involve the power supply:

A 450-watt power supply with a fan that emits bright
red and blue lights

Power Supply Features:
Model: LP-8850B
450-watt power
115v-230v manual switch

Power Supply Input:
115-230V @50/60Hz,10A/6A

Power Supply Output:
+3.3V/26A
+5V/35A
+12V/15A
-5V/0.5A
-12V/0.8A
+5Vsb/2A

Factory Plain Box Includes:
450-watt power supply

Edited by kr580, 10 July 2005 - 11:29 PM.

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#15
KGH

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It's not so much the hard stated overall wattage that is important, but rather, a combination of overall power and the 12v line amperage.

I think look for 450w, but with at least 18A, and more realistically 21A on the 12v line.

A power supply guide has been compiled at Hard Forum
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