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Video card vanishing trick?


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#1
Faero

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Recently I noticed my computer had half of the RAM it was supposed to, so I went in to reseat the sticks; however, due to the hardware layout inside my computer, I was forced to remove my video card from its AGP slot in order to remove the RAM. After reseating the memory (on a side note, it was successful, I've got my normal memory again) and placing the card back in the slot, I booted up the computer. Couldn't see a thing.

I then tried the video card in another computer (with the same exact hardware) and it worked fine, so it's not the card. As of now I'm forced to use my onboard memory, but that is less than acceptable and I can't play my brand new MMORPG I've been excited about.

The video card doesn't show in the Device Manager of Windows, and it still will never show anything on the monitor when I try to use it. I've removed and replaced it a few times in case it was part of the way out of the AGP port (a common error) but it was no good.

I'm using a Micro Star Phoenix MS-6390 motherboard with the latest BIOS.
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#2
lionelhutz5

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When you took out the video card, BIOS somehow may have auto detected that there was no more AGP card for video, and consequently went back to integrated, or onboard - whichever you like I guess. And obviously, it is back to onboard. Sounds like you may have done it - sorry if you have - but is there an option in your BIOS to change the AGP slot from onboard to auto?
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#3
Faero

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No, checked for that. The only AGP related option is a video card priority setting, which can be set to PCI or AGP/Onboard for which to use when multiple cards are found.
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#4
The Skeptic

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If you don't see the card in the device manager I think you should try to reinstall the card's driver. Let us know what happens.

Regards
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#5
Faero

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It wasn't that, but now the strangest thing has happened. It suddenly works. I didn't do anything to it, but it works. So apparently the motherboard and video card are sentient beings and are actively choosing when to work. Go figure. It's worked now without problems for a few days. Heh, thanks for the help anyway.
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#6
shard92

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my best guess with this odd case is dust/dirty contacts......I've seen this fairly often. dust a computer out and clean the contacts on the video card/memory sticks and it works.....
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#7
EMCguy

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The correct explanation is a windows haiku I learned as a little gipper:

Yesterday it worked
Today it doesnt
Thats windows

Only in your case it was just the other way around. :tazz:

Good luck

EMCguy
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