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Defragmenter for Linux


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#1
Tyger

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So far I've installed two Linux OSes, Mandrake and Suse, and they both are slowwww. Does anyone know of any tools, such as a defragmenter for Linux, which might speed things up?
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#2
mpfeif101

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The Linux file system isn't based on fragments, so you can't defragment it :tazz:
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#3
shard92

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both those versions of linux can be rather large and bulky what are you trying to run this on?
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#4
todd333

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mpfeif is right linux fielesystems do not need to be defragmented
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#5
thenotch

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When a file is written to disk, it can't always be written in consecutive blocks. A file that is not stored in consecutive blocks is fragmented. It takes longer to read a fragmented file, since the disk's read-write head will have to move more. It is desirable to avoid fragmentation, although it is less of a problem in a system with a good buffer cache with read-ahead.

Modern Linux filesystem keep fragmentation at a minimum by keeping all blocks in a file close together, even if they can't be stored in consecutive sectors. Some filesystems, like ext3, effectively allocate the free block that is nearest to other blocks in a file. Therefore it is not necessary to worry about fragmentation in a Linux system.
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#6
todd333

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yea, what he said
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