Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

DHCP?


  • Please log in to reply

#1
IKnowNothing

IKnowNothing

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
I obtain my IP address automaticly but I manually put in my dns ip...I swear several times I have checked it under ipconfig/all there was never a dhpc server before but now it says under gateway default dhcp server and then it has an ip address out beside it. Is this normally there and I have over looked it before? I have been suspecting my internet cable has some security issues as when I would obtain my dns automaticly I would find a lot of my exe programs trying to go there like 30 times over and over, of course my firewall blocked it but I sure found this unsual. After I was manually configuring my dns server from a ip the cable company provided I did not seem to have as many problems but then it seemed that got taken over too...after another call I now use one of the main dns servers ( which has nothing to do with the internet provider ) all was well for a bit till I noticed I now have a dhcp server. I do not have any viruses and I do not have trojans my system is clean. Can someone clear this up for me? I appreciate it very much. IKnowNothing...and I started with nothing...and I have most of it left..
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
SoccerDad

SoccerDad

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 190 posts
If you are obtaining an IP automagically, then you are most certainly using DHCP for same. If you are connected direct to the 'net via your cable modem (not recommended) then the server IP will be one of your ISP's machines. If you are using a router/firewall (recommended), then the IP will reflect the LAN IP of your router.

Bottom line: in your setup, necessary and not harmful.


Hope this helps!
Be well, SD

Edited by SoccerDad, 22 July 2005 - 08:46 PM.

  • 0

#3
IKnowNothing

IKnowNothing

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Thank you so much. I feel a little better but what is that is recommended when you said ( connected directly to internet ( not recommended) ? I think you are probably talking about a router? I have heard of that and it was going to be my next step and so it is a better way to go? I personally like my firewall (and after a few install and uninstall it at least tolerates me ) BUT if I have to configure this router to get it through the firewall ( and only it) I may not can make it work. Thank you again.
  • 0

#4
SoccerDad

SoccerDad

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 190 posts
Not a problem, glad I could help. Forgive me if I rehash something you already know, but I want to make sure the bases are covered.

The biggest problem with software firewalls is that they can be disabled by virus infection and/or their settings modified to allow the virus and it's friends in and out. In my mind, a bad thing. One thing they are good for however, is keeping track of and blocking/allowing traffic OUT of your machine. This can be an invaluable diagnostic tool.

Standalone hardware firewalls do not suffer from this at this time. Additionally, most of the consumer level stuff is ready to go right out of the box. You then only need to tweak settings for your setup. You could also use an older PC with a couple of NIC cards in it and a ready to go firewall installation like MonoWall for example.

Hope this helps!
ttysoon, SD
  • 0

#5
IKnowNothing

IKnowNothing

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Ha! Never assume I know something! I am learning by trial and error and a lot of restores. I have never had the problem before, I used to run a windows 98 ( which this is on dial up) I had no idea the problems with the security on Windows XP till after I had it. It took me awhile to even know that the problem was with the XP. I found out that the internal restore is not real great a feature, sure it puts the programs back but it saves the userdata that needs to be erased. Umm I know you will probably not believe this but I had no idea a router was a firewall...I thought it scrambled up ips or something so they could not find you...did I mention I know nothing? I thank you again for enlightening me and Yoda feel free to continue to do so!!! The router is as good as purchased!
  • 0

#6
SoccerDad

SoccerDad

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 190 posts
Not a problem mate, and I'm glad to hear you're going to be purchasing a router; you won't be wasting your money. For home level gear, don't spend any more than $75USD, it would be overkill (unless you are adding the wireless component which will add a few $$). Linksys, Dlink, Netgear and a few others all have decent low end consumer stuff.

And remember: we all knew nothing once! Browsing and reading the various posts on this board is a great way to get your feet wet and on the road to knowledge.

Best of luck!
Be well, SD
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP