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Think I broke my computer - questions


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#1
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This might be lenghty while I explain, so please be patient. ;)

I have (had) an emachines with a xp 2600 and fried the northbridge chip playing games when it got really hot in the house on the first hot day of spring. I assumed it was fried because the heatsink actually popped off the board. I didn't even know what a northbridge chip was before that happened. :tazz: After I replaced the heatsink back into the holes with the pins and springs the computer would lock up when I would try to play games. I restored the os and put in a new graphic card (agp slot) and the same thing happened.

So I decided to replace the motherboard. Except when I put it in it was shorting out in the emachine case (it reasonably shouldn't have but it was). Except I didn't know it was shorting out and spent an entire day going crazy because I didn't know what the problem was. In my frustration I decided to put everything back on the old board to see if it still worked. I can't get the heatsink on and off the clip thingies safely (didn't even attempt it) so I had my husband do it for me because he's able to do that type of stuff. Except I didn't double check his work after he put the heatsink back on the old board and he put it on backwards.

So naturally when I went to start up the computer, the fans were spinning but nothing appeared on the screen and the hard drive didn't spin or give any sign of life. I unplugged everything down to the psu and cpu before deciding it had to be one or the other. It was after that when I pulled the board back out of the case that I realized the heatsink wasn't flush with the cpu. It also explains the high/low whistling noise coming off the cpu and the funny dust smell off the heatsink when I would try to turn it on.

I taped up the risers in the case and put the new board back in there with the cpu, ram, and video card. It started up this time with the fans spinning but still no post or bios. I took out the ram and video card and still nothing. And the board can't beep because my case doesn't have a speaker wire. I think the emachine board had an onboard speaker or something, not that it was beeping either when the heatsink wasn't on there correctly.

So my question is, is it pretty safe to assume the cpu got fried? My other question is, I have tried resetting cmos a bunch of times just to be sure. Is it absolutely necessary to remove the battery? I don't see where it will come out without having to bend a couple pins and I don't want to break anything else. I don't know anything about voltages and stuff, and I know emachine ps are crappy but it looks like it should give enough voltages to make it power up correctly because the sticker has all the voltages listed on it that the pin things on the board need. And should I try setting the fsb to 166 before completely giving up on it? It's set to 133 right now.

Thanks for the help.
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#2
humorsavesmysoul

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i noticed you didn't try replacing the RAM. It's possible that the memory got fried. that would be my guess
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#3
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No I didn't try replacing the ram because I don't have extra ram to try it with. I have no reason to suspect the ram would've gotten fried. I don't see how it's possible. I also removed the ram and tried it with just the cpu and power supply. I was told if it still didn't work after removing it that it had to be either the power supply or cpu. Is this wrong? Either way I planned on sticking my ram in my mom's computer to see if it still worked because I believe pc 2100 is compatible with her's.
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#4
dsenette

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use this tool to test your ram http://www.memtest86.com/

and a system wont do anything if there isn't ram in it
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#5
Cook1

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Question for ya (I know I'm new here too) but umm, did you use any type of spacers or brass stand-offs inbetween the case and the motherboard?

I know that there are a few older cases that are raised in the spots where you would need to put a spacer/stand-off but if this isn't the case it's very easy to short out your board.
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#6
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It didn't have risers/spacers/stand-offs. But it wasn't touching the case either. It had "humps" or "mounds" that it screwed into. The only part of the board that touched the "humps" was the metal rings around the screw holes. It shorting out is a non issue, though. I taped them off and it was fine afterward. I also bought a new atx case yesterday and it starts up in there, too. Now I just have to get working parts in it, lol.
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