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RAM problem


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#1
Morpheus

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ok i needed some more RAM for my comp (i have512 right now) so i dcided to take out RAM from my old computer ad put it in my new computer so id hae 1024 RAM i added the 512 DDR RAM into the slot beside my current 512 DDR RAM and re assembled my computer and plugged everythin back in hit the powere button and my commputer does not start up!! what should i do to get this fixed?

i have alrdy removed the RAM i added in and it still does not power on
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#2
Samm

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Hi
Could we have your system specs please? In particular, the type of memory you are using & the motherboard.
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#3
WhatThe

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It is very unlikely that the ram you installed has caused any damage to other components in you PC.

Try unplugging the power and removing the Mobo battery, leave the PC for a minute or two and then replace the Mobo battery and try to boot your PC.
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#4
Samm

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WhatThe is right but its safer to reset the bios using the Clear CMOS jumper. Also, whichever method you use, make sure you disconnect the external power lead, then the main internal ATX power connector to the motherboard first before clearing the cmos or removing battery
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#5
WhatThe

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I disagree that it is safer, but both methods will work.
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#6
Samm

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I disagree that it is safer, but both methods will work.

View Post


why do you disagree?
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#7
WhatThe

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I have heard that if you perform the reset and forget to pull the power cable you may cause damage, I have also heard that it can drain the battery if done incorrectly. ( I have never seen these problems occur myself)

As far as I can see, you cant do mutch damage by pulling the power cable and the battery for a couple of minutes.

I notice That your method involves removing the main power connector to the Mobo. Ii is usually easir to pull the battery. (my opinion)

This is just my opinion of course.
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#8
Samm

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OK but I think you're missing my point. Before clearing the cmos, the external power lead should be pulled, followed by the internal atx connector, this applies regardless of whether you are clearing the cmos using the battery or the jumper.

The fact that cmos batteries are usually clipped in place quite tightly and there can be tricky to remove is more likely to result in damage (due to the user being tempted to use a pair of pliers or a flat bladed screwdriver in order to release the battery clip) than the simple removal of a plastic jumper cap.

And I've never heard of a battery being drained as a result of this method, even when performed incorrectly.
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#9
WhatThe

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It never occured to me that a person might have a problem removing the battery, I do it regularly so I guess it is easy for me.

There is more than one way to skin a cat.

(Pulling the battery to reset the BIOS is what we call "best practice" where I work)

I will ask the senior Tech on monday why he likes it done that way.
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#10
Samm

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Yeah ask him, I would be interested to know why as well. I agree that batteries aren't hard to remove with a bit of practice but you have to remember that a lot of people who come here for help do not have as much experience with this sort of thing as you or I and therefore I tend to lean towards advising the easiest, most risk free method.
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#11
Morpheus

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ok my system specs are the following, and how do youtake out the battery?

Windows XP SP2
512 RAM
Radeon XT 9600
3200+ AMD Athlon Processor
200 Ultra DMA Hard drive
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#12
WhatThe

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There is a small metal clip which holds the battery in, just push it away from the battery. the battery should almost "pop out".
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#13
The one

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i reckion u r both correct in your own ways but if some1 is not confident and has little or no knowlege on that particular motherboard then what could be simpler then pulling out a battary and removing cable from psu, even a novice cant mess up, where as messsing with jumpers can be deadly so all in all for the less advance user removing power cable and battary is prefered method.
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#14
WhatThe

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My sentiment exactly. :tazz:
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#15
WhatThe

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BTW I have spoken to James, (Senior Tech).

His reason for wanting it done that way is "its quicker"
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