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What kind of programing should i go for?


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#1
Throntel

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I want to learn some programing, but I don't know what to go for.
It's so many, C++, java etc. So I was wondering what would be a good start?
I don't learn programing at my school (except some flash, but thats 2 hours each week. With a teacher who doesn't really know to much about it herself).
So I will have to learn this by myself, all I know when it comes to programing is some VERY basic HTML,VERY, VERY basic Javascript (which I probably have allready forgotten) and some ... paint? :tazz:

Edited by Throntel, 10 September 2005 - 03:17 PM.

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#2
Dragon

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a good place to start would be either C++ or Java, not javascript thats it's own little thing. they are pretty much the same. I am teaching myself Java2 right now and have found it easier to learn then C++.
Of course it also depends on how you are learning it. there are some good books out that will teach you these things. once you have learned one of the languages, the others will fall together fairly easy.

so far using a self taught guideline, I have found that the Sams: Teach Yourself series is the best choice out there, and I have a few different versions of "teach yourself" brands of books.
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#3
Throntel

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Okey, you think the "for dummies" books will work?
And in Java, do I have to buy any programs, or is it okey just to use notepad?
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#4
Dragon

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the "for dummies" books are not as intensive in teaching you how to properly write a program, they are more of a tutorial on how it works and how to write very simple programs.

as for Java, you can download the SDK (software developement kit) from http://javashoplm.su...sactionId=noreg adn you can get the instructions on installing it from http://java.sun.com/....2/install.html.

The Java SDK is free, and you can use it to make object oriented programs once you learn the proper organization of the programming.
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#5
gust0208

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Once you have the SDK downloaded and installed, I highly recommend the free text editor called "Crimson Editor" for writing your actual code. It allows for multiple files open at once with a nice tabbed interface and features syntax highlighting (changing the color of words depending on if it is a function call, variable, etc.) You can check it out at:
http://www.crimsoneditor.com/

I agree with the previous posts that Java is a great place to start learning programming and especially object orientated programming.

Good luck with your start to programming and post any questions that you run into while starting out.

Cheers,
Tom

Okey, you think the "for dummies" books will work?
And in Java, do I have to buy any programs, or is it okey just to use notepad?

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#6
comanighttrain

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hrmm....i wouldnt advice java as that forces you to learn Object oriented straight away...

Why dont you try Python or basic? and then move onto Visual basic, Java or C.

I can find good Basic compilers and Python, python would be the best as its well documented with a load of free e-books and a line by line interpreter (this means, itll point out errors as you enter lines of code).

Also for Java, Use JCreator, its great, its a full IDE for java, its a good buffer before you (inevetibly) use Borlands JBuilder.

Edited by comanighttrain, 12 September 2005 - 07:14 AM.

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