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P2 and PC-100


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#1
Seven!

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I have some old hardware on a machine - an Intel Pentium II running at 266Mhz, two sticks of 128MB RAM, and another stick of 64MB.

Here are my questions:
I only know that one of the sticks of ram is PC-100, knowing that they all work together, can I say that they are all PC-100?

What is a Win98 compatible program for overclocking?

When I had this processor in a different machine, it clocked at 400Mhz, and changed to 266Mhz when I moved it to the PC it's running in now. There was a great difference in performance, however, and I'm just curious if it's really running at the speed it says it is.
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#2
Fenor

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Even if two of the sticks are 133, the fact that the one stick is 100Mhz means that all three run at 100MHz. Like almost everything else in the world, the memory is only as fast as it's slowest companion, or in this case 'stick' :tazz:

As for Windows 98 overclocking programs, I have no idea, but you can take a look here and see what you can find.

For the cpu speed test, I suggest you use the attached file and run it three times and take the average of that test to determine what your true computer speed is.

Attached Files


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#3
ea6b607

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"oops" srry accidently double posted

Edited by ea6b607, 10 September 2005 - 09:42 PM.

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#4
ea6b607

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Well that program u listed works though the smilies a little creepy... You can also try this it will tell u the speeds of all your ram temps hdd cpu speed.... pretty much everything your need to know about your pc

http://www.lavalys.h...p?pid=1&lang=en
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#5
comanighttrain

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i get these p2's through all the time, iv never seen any easy way to o-clock them.
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#6
Samm

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Hi there

If your cpu is running at 266MHz, then it will be using an FSB of 66MHz.
The fact that you know one of the ram modules happens to be PC100, doesn't mean it is running at 100MHz. The fact that the cpu fsb will be set to 66MHz, means that the ram is probably running at 66MHz as well.

In the last machine, the cpu was running at 400MHz, so was using an FSB of 100MHz & a multiplier of 4. You make it run at 400MHz in the current system, you need to adjust the FSB. This will either be done in the bios or on the motherboard itself by jumpers.

Before you do, use the program you downloaded to check to see if each of the ram modules are PC100 or PC133. If any are PC66, you won't be able to use them after the FSB has been increased.
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#7
Seven!

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I use CPU-Z. They're all PC-100.
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#8
Samm

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Cool, then just increse the FSB to 100MHz. If you can find out the make/model of the motherboard then you should be able to download the manual from the manufacturers website. This will tell you how to change the FSB.
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