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SCSI Drives ?


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#1
Gabriel

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Before I falk out a but of cash just wondering if anyone has any first hand knowledge of these Hard drives, ow they run etc..!?

Thanks guys
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#2
warriorscot

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scsi

Not for your average user requires a special motherboard or a controller card
. Stick with SATA or IDE.
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#3
Gabriel

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scsi

Not for your average user requires a special motherboard or a controller card
. Stick with SATA or IDE.

View Post


I am awatre of how they are used just wondering if anyone has any 1st hand experience with them.
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#4
warriorscot

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Right then well that article did give you the speeds there and thats the big factor on how a drive runs. Not many people use them they are for multimedia workstations mostly.
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#5
Samm

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Hi there

I've always used SCSI drives in my own machine - at the moment I have a 73GB U160 10000rpm Seagate Cheetah drive, as well as two IDE drives.

Warriorscot is right, IDE or SATA are adequate for most applications and are certainly the cheaper option.
SCSI drives are not only more expensive but also require a scsi controller card (assuming the motherboard doesn't have scsi built-in). For 50pin SCSI drives (eg optical drives etc) the controller cards are cheap enough but fast 68pin (Ultra 3 etc) scsi cards are expensive.

Some advantages of using scsi hard drives & controller cards are :

-drives are generally more reliable & faster - especially in terms of continuous data transfer rates
-You can daisy chain multiple devices on a single controller card
-The controller card will have its own bios which allows you to fully configure each scsi device individually.
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#6
fungit

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IDE hard drives are also alot more forgiving if you plug IDE cables in the wrong way that's fine, just swop it around the HDD works again, SCSI HDDs on the other hand will most probably die (someone not me I swear, killed a SCSI drive when I... I mean that person was 12)
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#7
comanighttrain

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lmao, pwned.

Im also getting a scsi drive at some point, just for experimentation. I hear sata doesnt give the full whack because most of the drives are the same as the IDE equivelant except with different interfaces.
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