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What kind of protocol is L2TP?


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#1
Stryker06

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Would L2TP be more of a Remote Access Protocol or a Security Protocol? :tazz:

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#2
dsenette

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Short for Layer Two (2) Tunneling Protocol, an extension to the PPP protocol that enables ISPs to operate Virtual Private Networks (VPNs). L2TP merges the best features of two other tunneling protocols: PPTP from Microsoft and L2F from Cisco Systems. Like PPTP, L2TP requires that the ISP's routers support the protocol.

from webopedia
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#3
Stryker06

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Still doesn't clarify it for me really.... :tazz:
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#4
kd1966

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What else do you want to know? besides the description, L2TP is also a physical layer protocol
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#5
Stryker06

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It's just that I can't figure out from that description if it's a security or remote access protocol. I choose RA in a test and got it wrong coz I got told it was a security protocol. but i honestly had the impression that it was RA.
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#6
kd1966

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Well, you were wrong................... it's a physical layer protocol that deals with VPN connections [Hint: that deals with security] L2TP has NOTHING to do with remote access protocols, which deal primarily w/communication
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#7
Stryker06

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What confused me though was when he asked to name a remote access protocol and i wrote down vpn as one of them he marked it as correct.
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#8
dsenette

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well..actually...it's not a physical layer protocol...its layer two...the data link layer

defined by webopedia as = At this layer, data packets are encoded and decoded into bits. It furnishes transmission protocol knowledge and management and handles errors in the physical layer, flow control and frame synchronization. The data link layer is divided into two sublayers: The Media Access Control (MAC) layer and the Logical Link Control (LLC) layer. The MAC sublayer controls how a computer on the network gains access to the data and permission to transmit it. The LLC layer controls frame synchronization, flow control and error checking

so...without knowing a whole lot about l2tp....i would say it's probably a little of both (remote access and security) but not a whole lot of neither...if that makes sense


webopedia defines the use of pptp as =Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is used to ensure that messages transmitted from one VPN node to another are secure. With PPTP, users can dial in to their corporate network via the Internet.

webopedia defines the use of lf2 as being similar to pptp...

so by definition it is a remote access protocol that controls security of the remote access connection (VPN)

Edited by dsenette, 22 September 2005 - 06:26 AM.

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#9
kd1966

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Uh............... whoooopsy.......... :tazz:
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