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#1
sha_Kai

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I'm at stgae with my computer where it just isn't doing everything I'd like it to, and am considering doing an upgrade; however, since it's an older model, I'm not sure if it's worth the cost of doing the upgrade if I'm not going to get anything out of it performance-wise.

The specs for the system are:

TX430 motherboard
AMD 400
S3 virge
SoundBlaster 16
128mb sdram
Windows ME

I did a little (amaturish) research on the TX430; the specsheet I found states that the maximum processor speed is 366. Is this correct? I'm certain that I'm running a 400mhz right now (that's what the bios tells me, anyway). It's not so much of an issue, as I won't actually be swapping processors, but it would be nice to know the actual maximum speed.

What I would like to do is install a newer video card and more memory. The motherboard maxes out at 256mb, but with a 400mhz processor, would I see that much of a difference?

I'm also thinking of finally getting XP installed, but since I am happy with ME, really don't see this as critical unless XP is a vastly better opperating system.

Any thoughts or comments would be appreciated, thanks.
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#2
OneCool

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I would start from scratch looking at your current setup..

How much money are you looking to spend?

Edited by OneCool, 26 September 2005 - 12:52 PM.

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#3
dsenette

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i agree with onecool (theres a first thing for everything isn't there one? :tazz: ) it would be much more economical for you to start over from scratch....the money and time you would spend trying to squeeze out the last little bit of juice from that machine would be more that you could build a decent system for.
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#4
sha_Kai

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Thanks for the replies.

I'm not sure just yet how much I'm going to be willing to spend on a newer system, except that the maximum I can afford is around $1200. Not looking for top of the line by any means, just something better than what I've got.

Edit:

Just to give you an idea of how frugal I am, I'm still using the the Compaq SVGA monitor I picked up for 25$ when my old one burned out some 5-6 years ago.

Edited by sha_Kai, 26 September 2005 - 06:45 PM.

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#5
Tyger

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You'll certainly be able to do a lot better than your current system for well under $1,200. You may be able to reuse your case and PSU and if you look for bargains you may be able to pick up a motherboard/CPU combo for a couple of hundred that will run rings around what you have now. You can take your time on the other stuff, replacing it when you find a good deal. The big deal is how fast you need to go, how much memory and how fast the memory is.
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#6
warriorscot

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You can buy a cheapo PC for a 100 quid ready to go out the box that will run rings around that thing. With 1200 bucks you will be able to put together a good 64 bit system with a fair bit of power(enough to get you playing all the latest games with nice high settings).
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