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Psu gone


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#1
Hello_Moto

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Hi,

I think my PSU has died on me so I took it out of the case and am going to go to the shop today to get a new one to install. The one I took out was a 250W one, but the lowest one they sell in the shop is a 350W one, would that still work if I just fitted that ??

I'm hoping that it's only the PSU that's gone and not the motherboard. Has to be the PSU i think as it only makes a buzzing noise when I plug it in !

Thanks for any help :tazz:
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#2
Kurt_Aust

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As long as it has the same connectors and is the same physical size, absolutely. A greater capacity in this case is a definate bonus.
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#3
Hello_Moto

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As long as it has the same connectors and is the same physical size, absolutely.  A greater capacity in this case is a definate bonus.

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It's an ATX, I know that for sure. As for the connectors, do all PSU's not come with the same internal power connectores for IDE drives etc ?

Hardware really puzzles me !

Cheers
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#4
Kurt_Aust

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As a general rule, yes they all have the same connectors for hard drives, CD-ROMs, Floppies, etc.

However, that being said, the connectors to the motherboard have changed over time. As you mentioned ATX, the main connector to the motherboard should be a 20 pin connector (2x10).

Most newer motherboards require another 4 pin (2x2) connector, but all new power supplies should have this.

Some top end video cards also require direct power.

For legacy support, ATX power supplies used to have an 8? (not sure how many) pin connector (8x1) for pre ATX motherboards, but as the power supply would now be worth more than a PC having that type of connection (try 486 or earlier) it's being phased out.
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#5
Hello_Moto

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Thanks mate, this has really helped me out.

Thanks again !
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#6
Hello_Moto

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Hi,

On this same topic again - what's the chances of the PSU having fried the motherboard too ??

Cheers
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#7
Hello_Moto

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I went today and bought another PSU, but it is a 24-pin one and my motherboard is 20-pin one. Is there a way around this or do I need to take it back to the shop and try and buy a 20-pin one ?
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#8
Kurt_Aust

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It should work just fine, if you look at the connector you will see that the pins are different shapes. It will only fit on one way with the extra 4 hanging off one end, so unless you have physical elements on the board that are in the way, you'll be OK.

I haven't seen any authoritive stats, but I'll replaced about 4 PSUs and all the motherboards were fine.

Edited by Kurt_Aust, 05 October 2005 - 02:03 PM.

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#9
Hello_Moto

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It should work just fine, if you look at the connector you will see that the pins are different shapes.  It will only fit on one way with the extra 4 hanging off one end, so unless you have physical elements on the board that are in the way, you'll be OK.

I haven't seen any authoritive stats, but I'll replaced about 4 PSUs and all the motherboards were fine.

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I thought i was in for a minute there !! Unfortunately there are things in the way and I don't want to bend them out of the way ! Is there any way I can get around this ?

Thanks for all your help with this
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#10
Kurt_Aust

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On my power supply the extra 4 are held on by a plastic clip, I'm guessing yours can't be removed without the use of a knife. I guess it's back to the shop in that case.

(Off to work now, no futher help available for 10 hours or so)
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#11
Doby

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Heres what you need here

I new they made them to convert a 24 pin mobo to a 20 pin psu but I didn't thing they had them in the opposite, good old newegg.

Rick
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#12
Hello_Moto

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You were right, the extra four pins came off and I got it fitted in ok, but when I plug the system back in and press the power button, nothing works, no lights, no fans, no nothing. Does that mean that the motherboard has died or do I need to place the drive and floppy disk power connectors in a certain order ??

Thanks for the help with this !
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#13
Kurt_Aust

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Don't Panic! ™

First check the obvious:
1. If there is a switch at the back of the PSU make sure it is on and that if there is a voltage selector (110/240) that it is set correctly.
2. Ensure all power connecters are secure and that you haven't missed any (your motherboard if P4 equivalent or later may need the 4 pin [2x2] connector I mentioned).
3. Make sure you haven't dislodged anything, especially check the RAM and video card.
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#14
Hello_Moto

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Don't Panic! ™

First check the obvious:
1. If there is a switch at the back of the PSU make sure it is on and that if there is a voltage selector (110/240) that it is set correctly.
2. Ensure all power connecters are secure and that you haven't missed any (your motherboard if P4 equivalent or later may need the 4 pin [2x2] connector I mentioned).
3. Make sure you haven't dislodged anything, especially check the RAM and video card.

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Thanks for this mate, I'll check into that when I get home ! :tazz:
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#15
Kurt_Aust

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Now if that doesn't work try the following:

1. Disconnect the power from all Hard Drives and CDROMs
2. Remove all expansion cards except the video card
3. Try booting with this setup (only motherboard, RAM and video card)
4. If that's OK, reinstall expansion cards and try again
5. If still OK, start reattaching devices (try to put an even load on each power lead)
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