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What to do to LEARN OCing


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#1
Master_Axe

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Hi,

I'm 16 right now (actually just wrote this post, made the thread, but had to leave fast, and I had forgotten to log on :)), and since I still live with my parents, and they fly around the globe a lot, I use a laptop to play my games. I just thought about my future, though, and came to realize that once I'm a college student, and I'm on a budget, I will neither move around a lot, nor will i have much money, but I'll still want to play games :). So I figured I'll have to buy a cheap computer, and OC every part of it :). Problem is, I've never OCd, and I don't want to learn on my future desktop, since I don't want to screw 100$ or something in that direction.

My question here now is: How should i start to OC? Would you recommend that I buy a desktop, as cheap as possible, and learn on that? Roughly how much would that cost? Plus, that would have to be built by me, otherwise I can't OC, because of the weird BIOS that Dell etc. put on, right?
My other option is to use the true desktop (because it's so old, it's actually one of those things that the monitor sits on :tazz:) my school gave me 6 months ago. It's ready to be discarded, but maybe I could OC that? The problem here is that although I can read the voltage and heat, I'm quite sure I can't change that, due to the "Award" BIOS. Can I somehow put a new BIOS on, or something?

Thank you for your help,

Franz
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#2
warriorscot

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You can go over some of the principles of OCin on an old pc but you wont get all to much out of it as it will be older and dont tend to handle overclocking as well as newer chips will, well they do it just doesnt seem as much because you are used to faster chips which overclock by a seemingly larger amount but when worked out in ratios is about the same. If you are a gamer and you are going to OC you first have to start with a half decent PC to begin with and invest in a good case and cooling(it isnt cheap, cheaper than a new cpu and gfx etc. but still aint cheap if you do it right and want a good safe overclock).

There may be a BIOS upgrade but overclocking options put into the bios specifically for that purpose are more of a feature on newer motherboards, they practically say overclock here, some will even overclock themselves automatically when more speed is needed.

The best way to learn about overclocking is to read through the many dedicated overclocking and modding sites and they are a treasure trove of info on the subject and have good arguments on the best ways to do things for particular hardware( handy as OCing is kinda a black art it has principles but it varies for every pc), Also hardware reviews on the overclockability of chips are useful as they give good hints on what specific chips can do and what they need(there has been a few on the newer AMD chips, notably the 3000-3200 venice and 3800 X2, the reviews are good to read but can warn you of potential hazard)
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#3
Master_Axe

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So, I won't try OCing now, since my laptop will be fine for the coming two years. You recommend that I should try OCing on my then new computer, for the first time... Do frys happen a lot, at least the first time someone tries? Supposedly not....

€: Lol, curios and all, i started CPU-Z, and guess what my FSB:DRAM ratio is... 1:2 lol.

Edited by Master_Axe, 08 October 2005 - 03:41 PM.

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#4
warriorscot

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Well i wouldnt really try it all most of the time its more bother than its worth, it takes a decisive effort and alot of stupidity to fry a part especially if its on a new motherboard they have pretty sophisticated systems to allow you to overclock but prevent you from breaking your PC.
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