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C:\WINDOWS\system32\40wjn.exe message


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#1
soujrnr

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Hi Gang,

I am working on a friend's computer. It's a 2.7 GHz Intel machine running XP Home. After several hours of deleting viruses, spyware, trojans, and God only knows what else, I finally got the system clean. After rebooting and opening Internet Exploder, I got the following message:

C:\WINDOWS\system32\40wjn.exe The NTVDM CPU has encountered an illegal instruction.
CS: 0571 IP:0126 OP:c6 56 e4 16 d6.
Choose "close" to terminate the application.


I've never seen that before. Does anyone have any idea what is causing this? Does it have something to do with 16-bit versus 32-bit differences between Windows XP and older Windows apps? :tazz:

Once I close out the window, I can surf just fine on IE. I just don't like this error message showing up for my friend when it wasn't showing up before.

Penny for your thoughts.

Mike

Edited by soujrnr, 16 October 2005 - 08:39 PM.

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#2
wannabe1

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Hi soujrnr...Welcome to G2G!

You will need an XP installation CD for either of these procedures. If prompted for a product key, use the one for the version of Windows on the machine you are working on.

Try this REPAIR to your installation of XP. This procedure will not damage or change your current files or settings...it will just repair or replace damaged system files. You will be asked for your Installation CD and may be asked for your product key. Follow the instructions carefully...print them out if you can. Note: This option is not always available on OEM Recovery Cd's

If the Repair feature is not available on your CD...Click Start then Run...type sfc /scannow (Note the space between sfc and /) and press "Enter". You will be asked for your installation cd, so have it handy. Wait for the scan to finish (this might take up to an hour). When it's finished, click Start then Run...type chkdsk /r /f (Again...note the spaces) and reboot when prompted (type Y and press Enter). This will run on boot-up so restart will take a while...be patient.

wannabe1
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#3
soujrnr

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Hi Wannabe1,

I did as you suggested and it ran through the entire scannow function without stopping and without prompting me for the XP CD. I then installed the XP CD, rebooted, and selected "Repair" but then it brings me to a DOS prompt in the \WINDOWS directory (after I provided the admin password). Um, I've never had to do this before and it's uncharted territory for me. What is it that I should do now at this prompt?

Thanks for your help!

Mike
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#4
wannabe1

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Hi soujrnr...

Sounds like you've entered the Recovery Console...not what we want. Restart with the CD in the drive.

On the "Welcome to Setup" screen Press Enter

Press F8 on the next screen to accept the license agreement.

On the next screen, Press the R key To repair the selected Windows XP installation.

From there on it should be pretty simple to follow...if you have any questions, please ask.

wannabe1
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#5
soujrnr

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Did I mention this was an HP Pavilion? It has a partition called "HP Recovery" but I'm afraid to use that because I don't know where it's restore point is. It might just put it back into the condition it was before I fixed it (except for this one message I'm still getting...but only when IE is open and I click on a link). I'm just wondering if it's safe to do this because I don't know how HP configures their systems. If I do this repair, will it screw up something that HP does to their systems or screw up the system in general? I wouldn't think so but I don't typically work on systems that are as proprietary as HP. Penny for your thoughts, guva. :-)

Mike
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