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Wireless Connection Unavailable


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#1
venn

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I have a Intel® PRO / Wireless LAN 2100 3A Mini PC Adapter.

Computer System
Microsoft Windows XP
Home Edition
Version 2002
Service Pack 1

I am using ADSL 2/2+ Ready Wireless LAN 802.11g 4 Port Ethernet & USB Combo Router.

I can only use ethernet connection but i can't use my wireless connection. There will always be a red cross X at the window start taskbar and when mouse rollover it will popup msg saying wireless connection unavailable. When i right-click it and click view available wireless network with my wireless router on, no connection is available.

Why is that so?
How to configure my settings?
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#2
venn

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i am sure the router wireless service is active. I have tried using my dad's laptop and is working absolutely fine. i try to copy paste the info from my dad's laptop to mine, but it seems that my dad has a newer version of windows, because the wireless connection properties has different menus and options. it that because my windows has an older version so i can't use my wireless connection? i don't think so.
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#3
SandyJax

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I Googled "Intel® PRO / Wireless LAN 2100 3A" and the first thing I saw was Intel's white paper, which said this is a 802.11b adapter. Your WRouter is 802.11g, which (I think) should also accept "b" signals, but I don't know for sure. Can you check that?
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#4
kd1966

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"g" is normally backward compatible with "b"................ but that's not to say this is the case here. He should check the router for a "g" only option and deselect that to allow slower connections
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#5
venn

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okay i have a question, is there anyway to detect whether my wireless card is malfunction ?? it is impossible right? because i can still connect adsl using my ethernet port. wireless and ethernet same card right?
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#6
SandyJax

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No, it's not "impossible" for it to fail. As a professional network geek, I see WNICs on a weekly basis that don't work. They _think_ they are fine, but they just don't see anybody else out there. I'm not a theory guy, but I would assume that all the control circuitry is still okay, but the "power amp" in the RF transciever section has blown.
I take the pragmatic approach. I have a laptop with builtin Ethernet NIC, and I have add-in PCMCIA cards for 802.11a, b, and g. Well, the g is USB, but you get my point.
If I take my laptop to your network, and I can connect but you can't, I tell you "I'm a trained, certified, and experienced professional network geek, and your wireless card has failed. You need a new one." And charge you for my visit.
Certainly, it's possible for your ethernet port to work, while the wireless side doesn't, in the same card. They are two completely separate sets of circuitry. They just happen to share a package.
Why don't you take your card to another known-working WLAN, and see if you can "see" their WRouter?
Also, as mentioned before, "g" is an improved version of "b". From the factory, your WRouter should accept both, but the "b" side may have failed, or it may have been turned off. Don't blame your card until you KNOW that the router is okay. They fail too.
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#7
SandyJax

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Uh, we may be speeding down the wrong road. If your laptop's system tray has a red X over the LAN connection, windows may be trying to tell you that there's something wrong with the NIC itself, rather than the link.

Start>Control Panel>System>Hardware>Device Manager lists all pieces-parts, and will tell you if Windows thinks the device is broken, or merely not linked.

(I know, there are easier ways to get there, but that way works -for our lurkers- on all modern versions of WinDoze)
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#8
venn

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thanks sandy...
i have checked the device manager..

these are my driver's properties
Intel® PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3A Mini PCI Adapter

Driver Provider: Intel
Driver Date: 1/11/2003
Driver Version: 1.0.28.2
Digital Signer: Microsoft Windows Hardware Compatible Publisher

Device type: Network adapters
Manufacturer: Intel® Corporation
Location: PCI bus 2, device 3, function 0

Device status:
this device is working properly.

* what i think now is maybe my driver is outdated? i should try to install the latest driver from intel. This is because i just got my wireless router few weeks ago. It is new, maybe my current wireless driver not compatible to it...

i will give a try and post back the result.
thx again.
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#9
venn

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i have updated my driver to the latest, my window to sp 2.
when i try to use the wireless network..
it says, " wireless network connection is not connected "
what is that? how to solve it? when i use another laptop, it's okay, it works fine. so it is not the router problem but my laptop.
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#10
venn

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i have solved the problem.
and guys, actually the first thing should deal with wireless problem is to make to turn on your wireless on your laptop!!!!!! (eg: fn+f2 on DELL laptop )
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#11
SandyJax

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Thank you, for getting back to us on that. We all need to remember that the newer laptops have wireless built in, and the BIOS / hardware configuration system has a way to shut it off, for security. Last year I was called in for a laptop with a builtin wireless that wouldn't work; this kicked our butts until we actually read the manual which told us to make sure the small switch on the side was "on"; it was there to disable the WNIC if needed.
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