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Severe Heat problem


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#1
comanighttrain

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Hey guys, i have a really bad problem.

I have an AMD athlon XP 3200+, gigabyte 3d rocket cooler, and a gigabyte K7 TRITON motherboard (GA-7N400S-L). I put it all together and the thing was running at 98 degress centigrade (thats 2 below the boiling point of water for people thinking in fahrenhiet). For the first time in my life im totally stumped, iv put it together twice and same result. The cooler is definetly rated upto 3200+, its definetly on snug the fan is definetly spinning, i definetly used heatpaste (not too much, not too little).

Any ideas? could it be a bad sensor or is their something wrong?

Dave
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#2
austin_o

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Hi. I would suspect it is a sensor issue. Take a look at this thread RE: 104 degrees c. Not much difference between 98 to 104....and if it was really that hot it wouldn't boot at all
http://forums.pcper....degrees celcius
Your body temp is approx 37 degrees C. Feel the thing with your finger. Does it really feel as hot as the sensor reports? Are you reading the temp with Gigabyte's easy tune? I use that, and Speedfan to monitor my AMD. Speedfan usually reports 25 degrees C, while Gigabyte reports 23 to 24 on one of my systems. On another, Gigabyte reports 40 degees C, and Speedfan reports 28.

Edited by austin_o, 28 October 2005 - 06:51 PM.

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#3
comanighttrain

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i was using the systems bios.

Funnily enough, i put my finger on the heat sink(at the base) after it reported 98, it was warm but 98 would burn my finger surely? I also downclocked the processor to 1.2ghz (100fsb) and it said 68 degrees.

The reason i dont think it is a sensor is because it had a £8 cooler on it before at it was sitting at 60 centigrade, it was only after i fitted the gigabyte cooler it started stating 100ish degrees. The supplier said i should bring it in for testing (so they can tell me im wrong and charge me £40).

Where can i get speedfan? i am so worried incase i have fried the cpu.
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#4
Kurt_Aust

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Funnily enough, i put my finger on the heat sink(at the base) after it reported 98, it was warm but 98 would burn my finger surely?


Would you burn your finger if you put it in boiling water? Metal is just as thermally conductive as water, so yes, if it really was 98 Celcius, you'd know it!
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#5
austin_o

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Google, my friend...google. I just did a search, here it is
http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php
:tazz:
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#6
Doby

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Hi,

First your cpu is not 98c if it was it would be a crispy critter and it would not be working, so that tells me its a sensor problem

I like the finger test its a good comon sence approach, in general

35C to 45C = comfortable warm
45C to 55C = need to pull you finger after 5 seconds
55C to 65C = need to pull your finger after 1 second
70C burnt finger

If you can determine the cpu temp by the above scale and its comfortably warm then it has to be a sensor problem.

There is another way to determine how far off the sensor is, this is unsientific but,,,,,,,

After the computer has been off for several hours take note of the room temp and boot up and as quikely as you can go into bios and read the cpu temp, the cpu temp should be the same as the room temp but maybe 5 degrees higher to account for the time the cpu has been running and the temp it builds in such time. The rest is sensor error

Rick
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