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Installing on Linux


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#1
CJIS

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I went on to the site KDE-Apps and then downloaded a game (KSudoku) and another application and I don't know how to install these games and would like to know how. If anybody knows how then please could you let me know. :tazz: :)
I am using PCLinuxOS which is based on Mandrake.

Edited by CJIS, 02 November 2005 - 10:32 AM.

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#2
nLang

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In what format did you download the application? For example, was it an RPM package, or something else? If you have no idea, just post the name(s) of the file(s) you downloaded. The file name extension lets you know its type.

If the file name ends in .rpm, it's an RPM package and you can install it like this:

Log in as root.
Issue this command: rpm -U packagename (where packagename is, naturally, the full name of the file you downloaded.)

That should do the trick if you downloaded an RPM package.
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#3
CJIS

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Well when I installed Wine it was a rpm package and that installed fine but this is just ksudoku-0.3.tar and ktechlab-0.2.tar. I will most likely need step by step instructions

Edited by CJIS, 02 November 2005 - 01:48 PM.

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#4
nLang

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Well, that is a bit more tricky case then. Personally, I'd go with an RPM, because that site seems to offer those as well and they are usually a lot easier to install, but since you've already downloaded those tar files, you could try installing them as well.

First of all, just to make sure: are the extensions of the files you have at the moment .tar or .tar.gz?

If the file really has only .tar extension, it means the file is a tar archive and you'll have to unpack it. You can do it with this command:
tar xvf filename

If the file has a .tar.gz extension, it means it's a compressed tar archive, so you'll have to both uncompress and unpack the file. You can do it with this command:
tar xvzf filename

In either case, you should have it unpacked now. You should see some new files or folders that appeared into the directory where the tar file was. Have a look at those files, there should be some instructions on what to do next, so do what the instructions tell you.

Often, these tar files contain the source of the program, and you have to compile it before you can run it. If this is the case, I'll point you to some compiling instructions I've written.
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#5
CJIS

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Ok I did this last night and then used the .config file as it told me too and then it said to chose a place to install it to so i did and it started working and then right at the end it said thet the folder I chose does not contain KDE Headers or Libs.
what are these and how do I get them?
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#6
Dragon

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it appears that you may have your post lost here.

in any event, if you have already gotten them installed let us know. If not the answers are below.

the KDE headers and Libs are files that help the programs compile properly for use with your KDE desktop. You can find these in your repositories/backports for the OS.

you can either use synaptic to search for them or you can use apt to get them.

in synaptic start the program and then click on search. in teh window that opens up type in KDE-headers and hit ok, click on the box for the version of KDE you are using, if there is more then one choice. then click on teh search buttron again and type in the name of the other files you need. mark them for them for installation then hit apply.

then do your program compiling again as instructed in the files you downloaded.

to use apt, open a terminal. if your system is set up with Sudo then enter the following in Terminal

sudo apt-get install file
where file is the file name you need to install for the compilation of the software.

hope this helps.

Edited by Efwis, 14 November 2005 - 10:21 AM.

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