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slave hd not in My Computer


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#1
p_mii_nawy

p_mii_nawy

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hey guys/gals
i was wondering if any of you have any way to get my slave hd to show up. it comes up in post and i can see it in the bios, but when i try to see it in windows i can not. device manager said it was fine and working. it is a seagate hd IDE\DISKST381031A_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_!_3.19!_!_\48333357534D4133202120212021202120212021
thats what i get when i look at the prop's. any idea to what might be happening?
2nd question
if we can reslove this what is the best way for me to move everything from my C drive over to the slave hd. my C drive is 37.8(40 gigs) and the one i want to pass the stuff on is a Seagate 80 gig
thanks for the help
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#2
Fenor

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Hi p_mii_nawy!

The reason you can't see it in my computer is because you haven't formatted the drive yet. Go to the CONTROL PANEL, double-click ADMINISTRATIVE TOOLS, and then double-click COMPUTER MANAGEMENT. In the new window that appears, click DISK MANAGEMENT. Now on the right side of the window you should see both your hard drives listed. Right click your slave hard drive listed there and choose NEW PARTITION. Follow the on-screen wizard to create a new partition format the drive and give it a drive letter. Once it's finished it should now show up in MY COMPUTER.

You can copy anything over to the slave hard drive you want, but keep in mind that you CAN'T backup programs themselves, but you can backup the profile settings for programs. You also can't back up Windows system files because there would be no need. What you will mainly copy over is your songs/pictures/etc. from your C drive to your D drive.

Fenor
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#3
p_mii_nawy

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well i wanted the other hd for an up grade. i have about 10 gigs open on my windows hd. here is an update, because i did not wait for your reply evrything went from bad to worse. i installed xp on the slave hd. when i put in the other hd that had home in it, it will not boot up. right now i am running on the knoppix live cd (thank God for linux right?). should i repair the 40 gig hd and see if i can get it to work? if so, which reapir option will i need so i will not lose any of my data that i have on it? also when we get it working again, what is the best way to move files from the 40 gig to the 80 gig?
also, my hd's will not show up on the live desktop. before they did. i got this error message when the cd was loading, " buffer I/O error on device hdb(80 gig i think,40 gig was set as master. funny thing though the 80 did not come up in the post) logical block 0"
My dad had his pro cd so i used that to install it on the the 80. now i need sp2 and the rest of my stuff from my 40 gig. can't i just burn the program files to a dvd and then move then over? how can i get the pro to see the home so i can trasfer my files? sorry for sounding like a noob. most of the time it was click and your done. hopefulyy we can get this done.
thanks for your help
PMN
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#4
Fenor

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There's really no need to put an operating system on the 80gig since it will mainly be for storage anyways. What you should of done is just put the 80gig in the computer, did what I said to do in my previous post to format it, and then transfer over files (mp3's, docs, etc...) to the 80gb hard drive. You will NEVER use up 40gb for just the installation of programs, and as such 40gb for the operating system hard drive is more than enough.

If you haven't messed with anything on the 40gb, aka tried to format it or delete files off of it, I would suggest that you put in ONLY the 40gb hard drive, set as MASTER, and then see if windows will boot up on it. If it does , then just turn off your computer, set the 80gb as a SLAVE and then boot up your computer and reformat it using, again, the directions from my previous post.

Fenor

Edited by Fenor, 08 November 2005 - 09:22 PM.

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#5
dunmer2005

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Hi! :tazz: I thought I'd help ya out on this one!

I had the same problem as you, so if you have win 2K PRO{like me} or win XP this might help you out ...I used this info for my 300 gb!

============AND=NOW=THE=ANSWER========================================

In Windows 2000/XP my drive is not displayed in My Computer or Windows Explorer.
Question
In Windows 2000 or XP my drive does not display under My Computer or Windows Explorer.
Answer


In order for a drive to be visible in My Computer it must be partitioned. In Windows 2000 or XP you may use the Disk Management Utility to partition the drive.

Accessing Disk Management and partitioning the drive:

1. Right-click on "My Computer".
2. Select "Manage"
3. In the new window, Computer Management, select "Disk Management" in the left-hand panel.

Note: If you are using XP and you do not see the "My Computer" icon on the desktop you may find it under the Start Menu. Right-click "My Computer" under the Start Menu and follow the steps mentioned above.
4. A new wizard may appear, "Initialize and Convert Disk Wizard". This wizard appears when the disk is not initialized. In order for Windows to create a partition the drive must be initialized (XP) or "Write a Signature" (2000). If the drive is not going to be setup in a RAID environment do not convert the drive to Dynamic.

5. After completing the "Initialize and Convert Disk Wizard" the drive needs to be partitioned. The initialized drive will display the available "Unallocated" space. To partition the drive Right-click on the "Unallocated" region and select either "New Partition or Create Partition". See example below:

6. Complete the "Partition Wizard".
1. Partition Type:
Primary: (Default) Select if less than four partitions.
Extended: Select if more than four partitions.
2. Select Partition Size:
Default setting is to make one large partition. If you plan to make more than one partition you will need to specify the first partition size here. Once the wizard is complete you will need to partition the remaining free space.
3. Assign Drive Letter or Path:
Option to assign the drive letter.
4. Format Partition:
File system: NTFS - recommended file system. XP and 2000 will still recognize files stored on a FAT 32 partition even if drive is formatted with NTFS. FAT 32 - XP and 2000 will not allow the partition size to be greater than 32GB. Use this file system if you want to dual boot between XP/2000 and 9x.

Allocation unit size: Recommended to leave this setting to be Default.

Volume label: Option to specify a name for the partition.
5. Completing the New Partition Wizard Summary of settings:
Last chance to go "Back" and change settings. If satisfied select "Finish".

=================END=================================================

Edited by dunmer2005, 20 November 2005 - 11:54 AM.

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