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Hard Drive Issues.


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#1
Parano1a

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Ok... I put together a new computer, consisting of a new hard drive, and one of the two hard drives from my old computer. To make things a -LITTLE- less confusing, I will number the hard drives.

Hard Drive 1 is the C drive from my old computer.
Hard Drive 2 is the D drive from my old computer.
Hard Drive 3 is the C drive on my new computer.

I started out with HD3 and HD1 in my computer. 3 as the C drive, 1 as the D. It worked fine, aside from the fact that SMART disk was always telling me that HD1 is basically dead.

So I transferred everything off of HD1 onto HD3, and switched HD1 for HD2. My computer started up fine, when I opened windows it found the drive, loaded it, everything looked like it was working. But when I go to My Computer, I see only the C drive. I went to Add New Hardware - both HD3 and HD2 are loaded, and supposedly working properly. SiSoftware System Analyses found both hard drives, says they are both working properly.
So I went to Disk Manager, and even there, it shows both hard drives... and at the same time, doesn't.

Please help!

http://img399.images...oblem3zu.th.jpg

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#2
Neil Jones

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The drive is showing up as "unallocated".

Which basically means Windows is being a bit thick and is waiting for you to tell it what to do with the drive.

Usually you just right-click in that area and Create a partition, then format that partition. When done, it'll magically appear in My Computer.

Of course, if there's stuff on this drive you want then the last thing you do is format the thing.
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#3
Samm

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XP is definately recognising the drive as being unpartitioned for whatever reason.

However, I also notice that the problematic drive is configured as disk 0.
With IDE drives, this generally indicates the Primary Master drive, which is the C drive by default. Basically, your actual C drive (the one with XP on), should be configured as the primary master drive. You may want to check you jumper configurations on each drive, as well as the physical position on the IDE cables.
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#4
Parano1a

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Ok, I'm not much of a Hardware guy, that's my dad's area of expertise; I'm the software nerd. So you're going to have to bear with me, and my poor explanations.

The new tower I have has another way to connect the hard drive. It's not a jumper cable, but more closely resembles a power cable. I'll try and figure out what it is when I can get ahold of the father.
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#5
Parano1a

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Serial SATA?
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#6
Samm

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Certainly sounds like Serial ATA. In which case, can you tell me which drive is SATA and which is IDE?
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#7
Parano1a

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The C Drive... which is listed as '1' (as opposed to 0) in the pictures.
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#8
Samm

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I assume you mean that the C drive (1) is the Serial ATA drive, right?

Depending on your motherboard, you may need to change a setting in the bios to ensure that the system see's the C drive as the boot drive (drive 0) instead of the other drive. This won't be causing you a problem at the moment because as far as the system is concerned, you only have one bootable drive anyway (on account of the other drive being inaccessible). When you get the other drive working again though, it could cause a problem as it may attempt to boot from the wrong drive.

Basically, as Neil Jones said earlier, you need to repartition the non-working drive. This will result however in the complete loss of any data that may have been on the drive but as it is inaccessible anyway, you may not have much choice. Was there anything on this drive of particular imortance to you?
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#9
Parano1a

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14 gigs of music and sound bytes (I'm studying for Radio Broadcasting, and make my own mixes/DJ), and about 22 gigs of movies.
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#10
Samm

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Do you know whether the drive contained just a single partition and whether it was formatted using FAT32 or NTFS?
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#11
Parano1a

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I'm assuming you are asking about the one showing up as 'Unallocated?' I have no idea... any way for me to check?
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#12
Samm

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I was asking about the unallocated drive, yes.
If the drive came out of a windows 98/ME system, then it will be FAT32. If its from a Windows 2000/XP system, then it could be either.

When you were using the old system with the 2 hard drives in (C + D), were there any other letters allocated to hard drive space (such as E), or were the only other letters used for CDROM drives?
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#13
Parano1a

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It was single partition, E was CDrom.

So is there a System Analyses or anything that will tell me if it's fat32 or ntfs?
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#14
Samm

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There is, but it's not that straight forward, because the drives currently not being recognised correctly.

I've PM'd you a small utility for you to use but be warned, if you use it, YOU MUST FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS EXACTLY!!

This is an extremely powerful piece of software that can render a drive completely useless in a couple of key presses, so be careful.

1. Insert a blank floppy disk
2. Open My Computer, right click on the Floppy (A) drive & select Format..
3. Tick the 'Create MS-DOS startup disk' box & start the format process
4. Copy the attached file (mbrtool.exe) to the floppy disk
5. Reboot the computer with the floppy inserted (NB you may need to change the boot order in the bios so that the system boots from floppy, instead of hard drive)
6. When the system has booted, at the A> prompt, type mbrtool <enter>
7. Select option 4 from the menu [Work with MBR]
8. Select option 5 [dump to plain text file]
9. When prompted for disk number, enter 0 (zero)
10. When prompted for Source type, enter O (letter O)
11. When the process has finished, press any key to return to menu screen, then press ESC twice to exit.
12. From the A> prompt, type ren mbrtool.dmp mbrdsk0.txt <enter>
13. Run mbrtool again & repeat the exact same process, except this time, when asked for disk number, enter number 1
14. When you exit mbrtool, from the A> prompt, type ren mbrtool.dmp mbrdsk1.txt <enter>

Remove floppy disk & reboot system normally back to windows. Attach the two text files created on the floppy (mbrdsk0.txt and mbrdsk1.txt) to your next post.
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