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Going to the wire!


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#1
HamburgrHelpr08

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So i have just purcased new computer parts (full custum) and i have a cable motum and was wanting to switch from the 11mps wireless to the 100mps cable. i know the basics on how to do it but is there anything that i need to know like pointers? thanks.

markus
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#2
SpaceCowboy706

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Hello HamburgrHelpr08 and welcome to G2G, :tazz:

The basics of your network speeeeeeeeeeeds are this:

Actual speeds for download and upload are controlled by your ISP. Not your card, meaning the maximum available speeds of the card (11mbs for wireless or 100Mbs from wired) are only attainable if the PC's in question are set up for a local shared network with no internet connectivity and simply conducting traffic from PC to PC. What this means to you is that if you are wanting to attain the fastest possible internet speeds from your computer your best bet would be to verify that you are not having any packet loss or latency from your ISP.

The fastest available speeds currently for residential users in the united states is from Comcast Cable and Adelphia at 15Mbs on the Downstream and 4 Mbs on the upstream. This means if you live in an area that is serviced by one of these two Cable operators and you decideed to upgraded to the wired Nic, you will only be able to pass traffic on the downstream at a maximum of 15Mbs (not 100Mbs). Keep in mind also that most all cable operators also have a monthly bandwidth usage limit of around 10Gb, So be carefule on high traffic or you may get extra charges on your bill.

Edited by SpaceCowboy706, 26 November 2005 - 04:08 PM.

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#3
Matt.F

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Just to add a touch to what SpaceCowboy said, connecting to a cable modem direct as opposed to wireless is much less complicated. You basically run a CAT-5 (or CAT-6) cable from your computer's ethernet card to the back of the cable modem. Please note, however, that you can only connect one (1) computer direct in this manner. To connect more than one computer, you'll either have to use a hub and purchase an additional IP address from your ISP or use a router to split the bandwidth.
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#4
Roffy

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Actual speeds for download and upload are controlled by your ISP. Not your card, meaning the maximum available speeds of the card (11mbs for wireless or 100Mbs from wired) are only attainable if the PC's in question are set up for a local shared network with no internet connectivity and simply conducting traffic from PC to PC. What this means to you is that if you are wanting to attain the fastest possible internet speeds from your computer your best bet would be to verify that you are not having any packet loss or latency from your ISP.

The fastest available speeds currently for residential users in the united states is from Comcast Cable and Adelphia at 15Mbs on the Downstream and 4 Mbs on the upstream. This means if you live in an area that is serviced by one of these two Cable operators and you decideed to upgraded to the wired Nic, you will only be able to pass traffic on the downstream at a maximum of 15Mbs (not 100Mbs). Keep in mind also that most all cable operators also have a monthly bandwidth usage limit of around 10Gb, So be carefule on high traffic or you may get extra charges on your bill.


11mbits/second is very slow these days. And means that he would be getting a maximum of 1.4MBytes/second which is most likely slower than what they are paying for. So upgrading to 100mbit wired will be beneficial because he could have speeds of up to 12.5MBytes. Can't forget that networking usually refers to Megabits (Mb) rather that Megabytes (MB).
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#5
Matt.F

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When he said that the fastest cable providers operate at speeds of 15 Mbs downstream, he meant 15 Megabits. The difference between 11 Megabits and 15 Megabits (which you'll only have under ideal conditions) is negligible. More likely than not, his 11 Megabit connection is faster than his cable connection, but he's not really wanting advice on whether or not to switch. He is switching, he just wants pointers on doing so.
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#6
Roffy

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ugh...don't mind me....hangover is having adverse effects on my thought process. *rollseyes*
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#7
Matt.F

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Hehe...whoops! :tazz:
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#8
HamburgrHelpr08

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so i should hook it up to the wire.
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#9
Matt.F

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You likely won't notice any significant speed increase by switching to wired connectivity over wireless, but it is always more reliable/secure to have a cable plugged straight in as opposed to sending a wireless signal.
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#10
HamburgrHelpr08

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thanks guys.
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#11
SpaceCowboy706

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dont forget to check for latency and packet loss also
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#12
HamburgrHelpr08

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what/
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#13
SpaceCowboy706

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To check and see if you are having any packet loss or latency. complete these steps:

FOLLOW THESE STEPS WITH YOUR CURRENT CONFIGURATION (with router):
1. Click on Start
2. Click on RUN
3. Type in CMD or COMMAND depending on your OS.
4. When the prompt appears type in IPCONFIG and hit enter
5. Copy down the Default gateway
6. Type in EXIT and hit enter
7. Click on your Web Browser
8. Access your router setup by entering the routers default gateway (copied down from step 5) and hit enter.
A box will pop up asking you to enter a Username and password. the username is generally either left blank or is admin. the Password is generally admin or password. try both combonations. If non work then post back with your router manufacturer and model and i will get it for youi.
9. Click on the STATUS Link or any link that takes you to a list of your current IP address / Subnet mask / default gateway / and DNS Address.
10. Write down your <DEFAULT GATEWAY>, this is not the same default gateway as listed in step 5.
11. Close out the browser
12. Click on START
13. Click on RUN
14. Type in CMD or COMMAND depending on your OS
15. Type in.... ping <DEFAULT GATEWAY from step 10> -L 1000 -N 100 ......REMOVE <DEFAULT GATEWAY> and put in what i had you write down - remove the <>....
16. When the test is done copy the results into a reply. labelled
<TEST 1>

FOLLOW THESE STEPS WITH THE PC CONNECTED DIRECTLY TO THE MODEM (without Router):

1. Click on START
2. Click on RUN
3. Type in CMD or COMMAND depending on your OS
4. Type in..... ipconfig .......and copy down your default gateway again
5. type in .... ping <DEFAULT GATEWAY from step 3> -L 1000 -N 100 ......REMOVE <DEFAULT GATEWAY> and put in what i had you write down - remove the <>....
6. When the test is done copy the results into a reply. labelled <TEST 2>

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