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Partitioning Program


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#1
W-Unit

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Well, on the old computer that I'm now selling, I somehow got a hold of a pirated version of PartitionMagic so that I could repartition and install Linux.
Well, I've lost that pirated program (and I'm a good boy now anyways) and I want to install Linux on my new PC, but it seems like every program out there is at least $30, just to repartition your hard drive.
There's got to be a free one out there somewhere; anybody know of one?

Btw, a trial program will work, but I've already tried several of these and most of them actually turn out to be demos, not trials (so they won't let you apply the changes to your computer).

Edited by W-Unit, 21 November 2005 - 12:04 PM.

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#2
Tyger

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Most Linux distros have their own partitioning programs, and will set your drive up however you like. If you're ready, just try running the install to see what options you have. What distro are you trying to install?

Edited by Tyger, 21 November 2005 - 12:43 PM.

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#3
Jo Franklin

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QT Part ED is included on SimplyMEPIS (Debian, :tazz:), which generally works quite well.
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#4
Kemasa

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Are you trying to partition the disk or resize the existing partition?

I get the impression that you are trying to change the size of the current partition in order to make room for creating a new partition. If that is the case, some distros, like Mandrake come with a program to reduce the size of a partition.
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#5
W-Unit

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That's a point, MEPIS didn't have its own partitioner so I assumed Ubuntu wouldn't either (that's what I'm trying to install now)

I'm trying to create a new partition, not resize one. Right now I only have one.
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#6
Kemasa

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Use Knoppix or DSL OS to access fdisk to repartition the disk (or one of the other programs:sfdisk, cfdisk, qtparted). DSL OS is nice because it is so small, around 50Mb to download, http://www.dslos.com/

qtparted also seems to have the ability to resize an existing partition, but of course that is a use at your own risk kind of thing.

You can boot from a CD and make the changes. It is a good idea to have such a CD since it can help to deal with problems/issues, even with Windoze partitions.
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#7
Dragon

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if you are keeping windows on your machine to dual boot with you can use the Windows disk management utility to make a new partition also.

See here on how to access it.
http://support.micro...om/?kbid=309000

And if your wanting to use Ubuntu here is a great step-by-step tutorial on doing it so you don't mess up your windows partition.
http://users.bigpond....au/hermanzone/
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#8
Tyger

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And one small but important point, defragment the drive before you do any repartioning, whether Windows says so or not.
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#9
Kemasa

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And one small but important point, defragment the drive before you do any repartioning, whether Windows says so or not.


Why is that? Defragmenting is only a good idea if you are planning on resizing a partition, if you are adding additional partitions it will have not effect. It is a good idea to backup all the data before resizing a partition.
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#10
Dragon

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Why is that? Defragmenting is only a good idea if you are planning on resizing a partition, if you are adding additional partitions it will have not effect. It is a good idea to backup all the data before resizing a partition.

on todays hard drives in order to add a partion to an existing hard drive, you have to resize any partitions on it. so you have to defrag regardless. If it is going on a seperate hard drive, then you don't need to defrag.

that way you don't have to worry about corrupting your windows install. not defragmenting prior to adding a partition can result in having to reinstall windows.

Edited by Efwis, 22 November 2005 - 05:14 PM.

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#11
Kemasa

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on todays hard drives in order to add a partion to an existing hard drive, you have to resize any partitions on it. so you have to defrag regardless. If it is going on a seperate hard drive, then you don't need to defrag.

that way you don't have to worry about corrupting your windows install. not defragmenting prior to adding a partition can result in having to reinstall windows.


While that is often the case, it is not always true. It really depends on whether the disk was "properly" installed or not. Using the default of one partition is not the correct thing to do. If there are multiple partitions and/or extra space not in use and due to that you are not resizing an existing partition, there is no need to defragment at all.

I think it is best to be specific and instead of saying repartitioning, you should say when you need to resize a partition, you should defragment and backup before doing so.
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#12
Dragon

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a properly installed Windows installation has only one partition. Unless the person installing Windows plans on installing another OS they will always have to defrag and resize the partition. Below I show you my system. I run Linux on a separate HDD. The Windows installation is a normal install done by Windows CD.

Posted Image
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#13
Kemasa

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a properly installed Windows installation has only one partition. Unless the person installing Windows plans on installing another OS they will always have to defrag and resize the partition. Below I show you my system. I run Linux on a separate HDD. The Windows installation is a normal install done by Windows CD.


I do not agree that a "a properly installed Windows installation has only one partition". That is the default, but is by no means proper and is not a good idea. It is best to create a separate partition to contain the user's data so that it is easier to backup and also so that you can reload the OS without losing data. There are many defaults in Windoze which are not good. Remember, the default install does not include all the recommended programs to protect the machine, so would you say that the a default install is proper or do you need to install additional software and configure the machine in order for it to be proper?

It is not a good idea to only have one partition with any OS. In the case of Linux, you should have a separate boot partition, root partition and home, as well other partitions if the disk is large. It is nice to have a second root partition so that you can load a new version of the OS without affecting the existing OS. This allows for testing to make sure everything is works.
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#14
Dragon

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1st, the average user doesn't install a second OS, for that matter the average user gets windows pre-installed when they buy their computer. So they have no control over that.

2nd, the average user isn't interested in testing software, regardless of the various reasons we do.

3rd, The average user doesn't know that there are more then one option for partitioning, let alone care about it. All they care about is the fact that their computer is running and they have access to the files. That is why Windows is so popular, it's already set up from the get go for the average user.

4th, I'm not going to sit here and argue symantecs with you. I agree that windows default is incorrect, however, in light of the obvious circumstances your argument is moot.

The standard is as follows when setting up a machine with dual boot between Windows and any other OS, unless you have already set your primary HDD up for dual booting.
  • Defrag the computer before resizing the primary partition for installing a second OS
  • Backup important documents/files you have
  • Resize your primary partition
  • Create the second Partition for the second OS
  • Install the OS
  • Enjoy finding out what the alternatives to Windows as an operating system is.
As of this posting I will no longer be replying to this thread based on Point 4 given above.
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#15
Kemasa

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...
4th, I'm not going to sit here and argue symantecs with you. I agree that windows default is incorrect, however, in light of the obvious circumstances your argument is moot.
...
As of this posting I will no longer be replying to this thread based on Point 4 given above.


I am sorry that you seem to not want to educate people and just seem to use the excuse of what you think the "average user" is. If people who know better choose to not educate people on the proper way to do things, then your average use will never learn or know any better. I have explained to people why they should not just accept the default and they have learned by it. While some may not choose to do what I suggest, at least I tried. It seems that you don't care to even try to share the knowledge of doing it a better way.

Your 3rd statement is condescending towards people and I have found it to be false since when things are explained, they do care. If no one tells them otherwise, then of course they are not going to learn or know better.

Your 4th statement contradicts what you said before. My "argument" is not moot at all. Please try to keep a more open mind.

Your standard list of dual boot instructions is also incorrect. If you are not willing to give people the proper information, then it is best to not give any information. First off, you should backup before defragmenting and most programs tell you that. It is also important to know that you don't want just a single partition with Linux. What about the swap? Please don't give people wrong information.

Based on your message, it is best for you to not reply to this thread, the reasons I have given above. I hope you give some thought to what I have said and choose to accept people as people who can learn and are willing to have new ideas explained to them.
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