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RAID 0 Configuration


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#1
manu08

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Could someone tell me for a RAID 0 configuration:
1. Do I need two or more hard drives of the same make (seagate, maxtor etc.)
2. Do they have to be of same capacity or they can be different.
3. Does the %age likeliness of the hard disk's failing, increase or decrease after the RAID 0 configuration has been established & by how much (approx. value)

Well, I am a pretty extensive user. Play a lot of games. Rarely every switch the computer off & these are the specs :

3 GHz processor with HT
2048 MB Ram 400Mhz PC 3200 (4x512MB)
128MB GeForce FX 5700 Ultra
80GB Seagate HDD 7200RPM
Creative Sound Blaster Audigy 2
Dvd-rom & Cd-writer
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#2
warriorscot

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Has two be two drives minimum of the same size and speed (make not important as long as they are the same speed) the percentage of failure is the same as normal drives except you have two drives so twice as likely one will fail and in raid 0 if one fails the array collapses and you have lost all your data.

It really doesnt give much advantage you are better sticking with two drives one for writing one for reading that gives you good speeds and the best data security as there isnt a way to recover data from a collapsed raid 0 array. If you are a gamer you might want to spend some money on a new gfx card rather than a HD.

You can have a striped mirrored array with three drives but they are a newish type of array and a pain it adds data security but you have one drive that only holds the parity data and even after that complete data recovery is not guaranteed.

RAID is more a novelty for home users than something you would want to do you are as well just not using it, its for corporate users really. You will also need a RAID controller if you dont have a good one allready in your motherboard.
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#3
dsenette

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i would agree....the only truly reliable RAID level (in my experience) is RAID5...and..that's just over kill for a home user....
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#4
manu08

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Well, I do have a RAID controller on the motherboard itself so yeah that's not a big deal. So your talking about RAID 5, tell me about that pls, like the advantages, disadvantages & requirements.
See, the main reason I want a RAID configuration is cause I don't like having more than 1 drive to save my files on, get's rather annoying when those last few MB's could have made up for something I'll need to transfer to the other drive. I find it hectic & difficult to search for my files so ya neway pls do let me know about RAID 5.
Thanks
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#5
dsenette

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well..if all you want..is to have both drives show up as one drive..just make them dynamic disks...then you can make a partition that spans both drives...you don't need to go into any kind of raid conditions for that.....being that most versions of raid...basically make it as if you only have one drive anyway..
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#6
manu08

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Ok but then for RAID 0 we know that if one drive fails the probability of recovering data will be near to zero. With this dynamic disks thing done, what would the probability be ? And will this have any effect on the performance ? Also, for this dynamic disks thing could I add a hard disk greater than my current 80GB or does it have to be same size & speed as I was told previously for RAID 0.
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#7
dsenette

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dynamic disk configuration does not offer any disaster recovery enhancement....and you can use drives of any size speed make model..whatever....the best disaster recovery option for home use...is keeping regular backups up to date...honestly...raid usually causes too many issues for home use...plus...if you just use the dynamic disk option...you can add as many drives as your machine can handle without having to rebuild the raid array...
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#8
manu08

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Ok, now this sounds perfect for me, only thing is how do I do this dynamic disks thing ?
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#9
dsenette

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http://www.microsoft.../dm_upgrade.htm

follow those steps to upgrade to dynamic.

i'll find some good i nstructions for spanning the partitions
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#10
warriorscot

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Your problem is actually a good thing you usually want to have more than one set of drives and partitions for best data security, if you become more organised in the way you save things your problem isnt really a problem, setting up one big drive like that isnt always going to be ab option you should get in the habit of proper storage techniques and just have a common sense personal filing system and you will be fine(it a good habit as well in the first place, i actually find one big hard dirve can make it harder to find things.)
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